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Arch Linux Now Provides Debug Packages, Debuginfod Integration

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  • #11
    Hey archlinux can you keep essential packages such as {glibc, gcc, binutils} up-to-date? They are still stuck on ancient glibc 2.33

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post
      Arch more and more looks like a respectable serious Distro actually capable of serving the advanced user instead of just being a joke to tease people on how "hard" it is to install, it just took them 20 years.
      More like noobs. Getting debug traces was always easy on Arch (and so was/is the installation process). Now it's just more convenient.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by gedgon View Post

        More like noobs. Getting debug traces was always easy on Arch (and so was/is the installation process). Now it's just more convenient.
        It was not easy, it was a pain-in-the-you-know-where. Rebuild and have to pray to God to reproduce it again. One time crashes could not be reported at all.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by mystiquewolf View Post

          It was not easy, it was a pain-in-the-you-know-where. Rebuild and have to pray to God to reproduce it again. One time crashes could not be reported at all.
          If rebuilding a package on Arch is hard in your opinion, you're probably using the wrong distro. IIRC, debugging packages are not installed by default on Fedora or Ubuntu, for example, anyway.
          Last edited by gedgon; 03 February 2022, 06:31 PM.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by hax0r View Post
            Hey archlinux can you keep essential packages such as {glibc, gcc, binutils} up-to-date? They are still stuck on ancient glibc 2.33

            you have beaten me to say it. This is exactly what I had in mind. I am annoyed thzt no one appears to consider those packages as important enough among the devs to update them.

            This is not nit picking on the devs for few days of delay. Those packages are outdated for months! glibc may be the most pathetic case considering that glibc new versions are released yearly. I just saw that glibc 2.35 got released earlier today.

            This means that glibc 2.34 won't never be released. This is bad IMHO...

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            • #16
              For those complaining about outdated packages, you should fellow this mailing-list conversation [arch-general] NEW RECORD! 769 packages out of date (archlinux.org)
              Last edited by Setif; 03 February 2022, 05:44 PM.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by gedgon View Post

                If rebuilding a package on Arch is hard in your opinion, you're probably using the wrong distro. IIRC, debugging packages are not installed by default on Fedora or Ubuntu, for example, anyway.
                It's more labour-intensive and most importantly you cannot trace older crashes before the debug package was installed cause the build-ids don't match. That said i might have exaggerated it a little bit, finding and installing the debug packages on Kubuntu was also time-consuming, but a little easier than fetching, editing and rebuilding. Plus most importantly it saved time from trying to reproduce again, you already had the crash.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by gedgon View Post

                  If rebuilding a package on Arch is hard in your opinion, you're probably using the wrong distro. IIRC, debugging packages are not installed by default on Fedora or Ubuntu, for example, anyway.
                  I think you're kinda missing the point. even if you're willing to build the packages yourself, the resulting backtrace won't be useful unless you rebuild using the exact toolchain and flags that built the non-debug package.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Setif View Post
                    For those complaining about outdated packages, you should fellow this mailing-list conversation [arch-general] NEW RECORD! 769 packages out of date (archlinux.org)
                    the only thing I got from this was that they never actually addressed anything. I don't care about the politics chat, to each their own if they don't force it down my throat, however I do find the lack of meaningful communication regarding this from the devs... concerning

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post
                      Arch more and more looks like a respectable serious Distro actually capable of serving the advanced user instead of just being a joke to tease people on how "hard" it is to install, it just took them 20 years.
                      Just like in every Gnome thread.
                      "This doesn't fit me, so it is a joke/toy"

                      There are really toxic people here, feeling themselves high above the plebs, who don't understand there is only one workflow, theirs!
                      The rest should be abolished!

                      Meanwhile, I have a media PC/server running. Which Arch Linux install was inherit from the first iteration on a Hasswell I5 4700K more then 8 years ago, through an AMD 2400G to now an AMD 5600 with AMD 6700XT. Never reinstalled, never had to rebuild the whole setup, Instead I can evolve and perfect the user experience, try new things. Because bleeding edge is just an update away. Never failed to boot, nor had an OS crash. Hardly a joke.

                      Use *nixes professionally since 1996 and Linux at home since 1998.
                      Oh, and I run Gnome, on my laptop and in the past, desktops since 1998. Run Wayland for 2 years and like it. Never got the hang of KDE. But run Openbox on my media PC. Use LXDE as remote from the Media PC with xrdp. Just to show I'm not dogmatic, but run what fits . But let's be honest here, Kodi is the desktop there.
                      Never liked Debian or (Open)SUSE.
                      I have to admit, I never could get Debian or Ubuntu running properly as desktop on a laptop. The installation failed, or I did something wrong with updates. Got frustrated with the, then, different init, yada, yada. This is coming from a guy who used Gentoo on his laptop for 8 years.
                      I find systemd a godsend, scrapped all my scripts in rc.d as soon I was at home with systemd. Plus I can feel myself at home at most distributions because they are based on systemd instead of their interpretation of an init. Work wise very nice.
                      It seems I choose the wrong horses consistently, don't I?
                      Last edited by markus40; 04 February 2022, 03:03 AM.

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