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Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Planning To Stick With Linux 5.15 By Default

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  • #21
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

    And guess who is the most used Linux OS in the latest Steam Survey...

    Some people live in their own bubbles. In their view, if they think or do something in a particular way, everybody does. It reminds me of a kid I saw in some news comments, were he/she asked "who still uses e-mail?". That poor soul are in for a big surprise once he/she became a adult.
    At my opinion, ALL people live in their own bubbles, the difference is bubble radius

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    • #22
      Originally posted by CFWhitman View Post
      Well, right now I am using Xubuntu both at home and at work. Normally, at work I run the LTS version, but right now I am on 21.10 because I just got a new Ryzen APU based machine and something in it is too new for the last LTS release to cope with. At home I am running 21.10 with a PPA for mesa, and Mainline installed to make newer kernels available (though the newest kernels have some kind of 22.04 dependency right now). I don't feel deprived. I'm running an AMD Ryzen 7 3700X and an AMD 6900 XT, and performance seems pretty good to me. I'm not that concerned with whether it's the absolute best I could be getting. I think my current balance between convenience and bleeding edge performance works fine for me.
      Likewise. I've never been bothered by installing a custom kernel or update mesa if necessary. My desktop has a Ryzen 5900x and AMD Radeon RX 6800, and while those were vital steps at the time they were new, now I just use a newer kernel and things are great. I'd rather have stability over a single digit performance increase.

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      • #23
        Shocked

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        • #24
          Originally posted by RedEyed View Post

          I believe that "gaiming" term a bit wider.
          Mostly "linux gaming" means to play Windows games on Linux rather than play games designed for crossplatform like Dota2, CS:GO, TeamFortress 2, etc
          What difference does it make? I'm also on 20.04LTS for two years now and play lots of Windows games on Steam, currently Cyberpunk 2077.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by perpetually high View Post
            Those bashing LTS users... you do realize one can install a Mesa PPA and within a couple seconds install a newer Ubuntu kernel or a xanmod kernel.

            Tell me exactly again how Ubuntu LTS isn't used for gaming? When literally every guide recommends LTS? I think you guys are living in your own world. For what its worth, I run 21.10 but the point stands. And I guarantee my desktop runs faster than any of yours. Not being a dick, some people just need a wake up call on their high horse. Cheers.
            When you are using PPAs to replace official packages, you are not using Ubuntu LTS anyway. The point of not using the latest mesa or kernel in Ubuntu is to have it more well tested and stable. That is why you are using Ubuntu. If you use PPAs from random users to replace all the important software in your machine, what is the point? It is not Ubuntu in any way, shape, or form, anymore. The PPAs are less tested and not from official personnel. If you are to use PPAs, you might as well use Archlinux and just forget about installing new versions of Ubuntu, just keep it updated with official repositories...

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            • #26
              Originally posted by RedEyed View Post

              I believe that "gaiming" term a bit wider.
              Mostly "linux gaming" means to play Windows games on Linux rather than play games designed for crossplatform like Dota2, CS:GO, TeamFortress 2, etc
              Actually quite a fair share of my games are Proton games: Wolfenstein, Doom 2016, F1 2019, Hellblade, Cuphead,... Since I am on AMD I have - as mentioned elsewhere - Kisak's Mesa PPA added. Dunno whether a newer kernel (20.04 gives you 5.11) would make a too much difference.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

                When you are using PPAs to replace official packages, you are not using Ubuntu LTS anyway. The point of not using the latest mesa or kernel in Ubuntu is to have it more well tested and stable. That is why you are using Ubuntu. If you use PPAs from random users to replace all the important software in your machine, what is the point? It is not Ubuntu in any way, shape, or form, anymore. The PPAs are less tested and not from official personnel. If you are to use PPAs, you might as well use Archlinux and just forget about installing new versions of Ubuntu, just keep it updated with official repositories...
                It’s optional, that’s the thing. Only advanced users who are trying to squeeze a few more fps should be tinkering with PPAs and such. But it’s not rocket science, either. However what happens is they forget about maintenance and cleanup and all that cruft builds up and bloats the OS and causes issues. That’s why a fresh install mostly “just works.”

                This is also why Michael runs benchmarks with default settings. You have no control of what a user does after they install an OS.

                20.04 LTS is only from 04/20, that’s not ancient. Mesa and the kernel were in a good place then. But yes they’re in a better place now, but users can update to the new LTS in a couple months and get all improvements.

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                • #28
                  I guess I don't have problem with the LTS being a bit behind, because you can always load the latest Ubuntu version. If you are working with latest hardware, I'd think you'd want to use the latest version of the OS anyway. I had to do that when the first Ryzen's came out . Now on 20.04 LTS and running my 5000 series systems just fine. Two are on default kernel 5.4, and one on 5.11. Nice solid systems. Caveat, I don't 'game'.

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                  • #29
                    LTS Ubuntu with LTS kernel is verry nice, now if we could get version numbers that track upstream that would be ideal.

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                    • #30
                      Honestly, outside of drivers it really doesn't matter a whole lot what distribution a person runs in regards to Linux gaming. It's been like that since around 2020 for most desktop-focused distributions. If the distribution works for you and your hardware as well as has Steam in the repos, that's likely good enough and you'll have a good enough time.

                      On my system pretty much every Linux-native game on Steam runs better with the Steam Runtime than with Steam Native. As far as non-Native Steam games are concerned: Proton and Proton-GE run most all of those.

                      For non-Steam native games and non-Steam Windows games, Lutris and their profiles help a lot as does launching games from Steam so they can leverage the runtime or Proton. That's where the "Steam in the repos" comment comes into play. For noobs, and my experienced ass for that matter, it's easier to leverage Steam than it is to install a shitload of old libraries and write launch scripts to use tweaked $PATHs.

                      Ubuntu, Arch, Fedora, Slackware, Manjaro, Gentoo, Mageia, Tumbleweed. It doesn't really matter which when we're essentially constrained to how well the Steam Runtime performs

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