Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fedora 36 Planning To Run Wayland By Default With NVIDIA's Proprietary Driver

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • JeansenVaars
    replied
    Originally posted by sarmad View Post

    Hmm, are you saying that it works well on your side with both the internal display as well as an external monitor over HDMI on at the same time (extended desktop)? Because this setup on my side is very sluggish on an MSI GS66 (RTX 3060). Also, are you using Gnome or KDE?
    Yes, it works perfectly fine on my Laptop. The only Issue I think is that HDMI loses audio when Dynamic Power Management is enabled. So I setup a script to disable Dynamic Power Management to enable full GPU mode when I need it.

    I use mostly a 144hz Monitor which most of the times I connect through both HDMI or HDMI through USB-C (Dock) depending if I am working or not.
    In other occasions in the past I tried the Mini-DP port successfully.

    I installed it following PRIME guide in ArchLinux wiki, by setting the udev and the dynamic power management rule.

    With Dynamic Power Management I do have to offload from CPU to Nvidia to run applications on GPU, although some applications like Chrome browser triggers it automatically when running WebGL stuff.
    Firefox is absolutely garbage of course so it is out of the question when it comes to hardware acceleartion with Nvidia on Linux over there.
    Wayland is also out of the question. It is so far away that I already made my mind that I'll be spending tons of time in X11 in the next years.
    I am on KDE Plasma 5.23.x

    Leave a comment:


  • sarmad
    replied
    Originally posted by JeansenVaars View Post

    Ehh I disagree. Got an MSI GS65 Stealth laptop with an RTX 2060 with both HDMI and DP output monitors... it's the typical PRIME hybrid graphics setup. The problem is when people use packages like optimus-manager and other software that assume certain things about hardware which are usually plain wrong. I am using eOS (Arch) and by following this guide https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/PRI...render_offload, the hard way, I get to enjoy 8W battery discharge rate on my laptop, where otherwise with the GPU on I'd get twice consumption. Only X of course. Wayland doesn't stand a chance, you get 10fps animations, sluggish and glitching. Of course it is not a smooth ride like Windows ofc.
    Hmm, are you saying that it works well on your side with both the internal display as well as an external monitor over HDMI on at the same time (extended desktop)? Because this setup on my side is very sluggish on an MSI GS66 (RTX 3060). Also, are you using Gnome or KDE?

    Leave a comment:


  • sarmad
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    Typical "this is a bad concept because it works perfectly in Windows and makes Linux look bad" sour grapes.
    Not only are you ignorant about the technical details, you also misquoted me. I never said it works "perfectly" on Windows, because it actually doesn't. I said it works fine; it still has bugs but are bearable under Windows compared to Linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by sarmad View Post

    You are not the only one. Hybrid graphics is broken for EVERYONE on both X11 and Wayland; and anyone who says it works fine is either someone who doesn't use external monitors, or someone who doesn't care about 10 fps desktop animations.

    The whole concept of hybrid graphics is a bad over complicated idea. It complicates both the hardware and the software and is a source for a lot of bugs. The only reason it works fine on Windows is because Microsoft puts a huge amount of man power on ironing out all the edge cases. The solution from the very beginning should've been a discrete GPU that can power down some of its cores, or something like that, to keep power usage down, and I fail to understand why humanity has failed to invent something like this.
    Typical "this is a bad concept because it works perfectly in Windows and makes Linux look bad" sour grapes.

    If it were working perfectly on Linux but broken in Windows, everybody will be singing a completely different tune.

    Leave a comment:


  • JeansenVaars
    replied
    Originally posted by sarmad View Post

    You are not the only one. Hybrid graphics is broken for EVERYONE on both X11 and Wayland; and anyone who says it works fine is either someone who doesn't use external monitors, or someone who doesn't care about 10 fps desktop animations.

    The whole concept of hybrid graphics is a bad over complicated idea. It complicates both the hardware and the software and is a source for a lot of bugs. The only reason it works fine on Windows is because Microsoft puts a huge amount of man power on ironing out all the edge cases. The solution from the very beginning should've been a discrete GPU that can power down some of its cores, or something like that, to keep power usage down, and I fail to understand why humanity has failed to invent something like this.
    Ehh I disagree. Got an MSI GS65 Stealth laptop with an RTX 2060 with both HDMI and DP output monitors... it's the typical PRIME hybrid graphics setup. The problem is when people use packages like optimus-manager and other software that assume certain things about hardware which are usually plain wrong. I am using eOS (Arch) and by following this guide https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/PRI...render_offload, the hard way, I get to enjoy 8W battery discharge rate on my laptop, where otherwise with the GPU on I'd get twice consumption. Only X of course. Wayland doesn't stand a chance, you get 10fps animations, sluggish and glitching. Of course it is not a smooth ride like Windows ofc.

    Leave a comment:


  • sarmad
    replied
    Originally posted by arglebargle View Post
    You guys all realize that you can just choose the Gnome X11 session option at login right? Nothing is going to force you to use Wayland if there are still bugs to be worked out.
    Have you seen how sluggish Gnome animations are on X11? If not, then just connect an external monitor; if you can stand the agony of 10 fps animations that is.

    Leave a comment:


  • sarmad
    replied
    Originally posted by cewbdex View Post
    I guess I'm out of luck with hybrid graphics on laptop 🙃
    You are not the only one. Hybrid graphics is broken for EVERYONE on both X11 and Wayland; and anyone who says it works fine is either someone who doesn't use external monitors, or someone who doesn't care about 10 fps desktop animations.

    The whole concept of hybrid graphics is a bad over complicated idea. It complicates both the hardware and the software and is a source for a lot of bugs. The only reason it works fine on Windows is because Microsoft puts a huge amount of man power on ironing out all the edge cases. The solution from the very beginning should've been a discrete GPU that can power down some of its cores, or something like that, to keep power usage down, and I fail to understand why humanity has failed to invent something like this.

    Leave a comment:


  • edoantonioco
    replied
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post

    SDL support for Wayland is still officially unsupported and in beta though, and has known bugs. And that's assuming the game really doesn't use X directly, which may or may not be true.

    So the real test is whether the game works on Wayland in any non-nvidia driver. Then you can test if nvidia in particular breaks it.
    Since it's an Optimus laptop I do know Wayland SDL games works on the Intel card. But not on nvidia

    Leave a comment:


  • smitty3268
    replied
    Originally posted by edoantonioco View Post
    That's not how it works. In SDL games you can choose whether to use x11 or Wayland, so the game is not tied in any way to x11
    SDL support for Wayland is still officially unsupported and in beta though, and has known bugs. And that's assuming the game really doesn't use X directly, which may or may not be true.

    So the real test is whether the game works on Wayland in any non-nvidia driver. Then you can test if nvidia in particular breaks it.
    Last edited by smitty3268; 08 December 2021, 03:51 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ungweliante
    replied
    Originally posted by Vorpal View Post

    That is not exactly an uncommon setup for a laptop though. For me at least I have 1-2 external monitors plugged in more often than not by a far stretch: My work laptop (Thinkpad P15 Gen1) has the external display outputs hooked up to the Nvidia Quadro GPU. I would love to run it in hybrid mode to save on battery when I do use it on the go, but I currently run it in full on nvidia-all-the-time mode due to stability issues (under XOrg even!). Battery life sucks as a result, but I probably use it docked or on the power brick 90-95% of the time anyway.
    I have the same laptop for work too and I'm hating it because if I plug an external screen, the fan is active almost all the time.

    Do you also observe that? Did you find any mitigation?

    In comparison, the previous laptop I used, a P50 also with a Nvidia card was always silent unless you started a heavy GPU/CPU task.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X