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Ubuntu 21.10 Released With GNOME 40 Desktop, Many Underlying Improvements

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  • #41
    Originally posted by stargazer View Post

    While I understand, and agree, why "bleeding edge" should not be the default for most distros, this attitude is one of the more frustrating aspects of the Linux community. If Fedora met my user requirements, I might well be using it. I'm not. On the other hand, I do have a need to have later kernels and other software. I have an RX5700XT (NOT a bleeding edge card any more) that has regular green screen crashes. Some kernel, and mesa, updates have improved the situation, others have regressed it. I'm hoping one of these kernel, mesa, etc. updates will resolve the issues. So I'm stuck waiting and dealing with crashes when it is possible a fix may be available already. And please don't try to tell me to compile and deploy later kernels myself. 1. I can't afford to have my main system down for a few days trying to fix things if something goes badly wrong and 2. my experience compiling and deploying software is about 25 years out of date, and was not that extensive to begin with. It's not something an average user should ever hear as a recommendation.

    What I would like to see would be a channel built into Ubuntu and derivatives where a user can choose to move more aggressively on updates to resolve issues. It shouldn't be the default, but it should be an option without having to be a software developer and getting out of spec.
    5xxx series are broken on silicon. There's nothing you can do with software to solve this.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by stargazer View Post

      While I understand, and agree, why "bleeding edge" should not be the default for most distros,
      That argument is BS anyway. Google uses Gentoo as a base for ChromeOS and Valve uses Arch as a base for the new SteamOS. So anyone claiming most end users and corporate should not use bleeding edge is out of their minds as the aformentioned two large (!) companies are using and pushing bleeding edge.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by Operius73 View Post

        People have different definitions of stability.
        For me stability is having no surprises after an update. What I have is what it is, and it will stay what it is. Just security updates, nothing more. No surprises by some developer that decided that a program I use should have a different lay-out of the gui, or having functionality removed or altered. No suprises by some developer that decided that my desktop should change its lay-out like with gnome3.x to gnome40.
        So you keep on using an old distro forever? 'Cause as soon as you upgrade to a newer version of your distro, things will change anyway.

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        • #44
          I don't know what's wrong with people in here. Or are there just so many paid Fedora trolls?

          Ubuntu is sticking to Gnome 40 because their feature freeze usually happens 4-6 weeks before a new Gnome version is officially released. It means they would have to develop and test their customizations (and they have many to make something user-friendly out of Gnome) based on a beta or RC version of Gnome (while Gnome devs are known for last minute changes).
          This is not serious in any sort of way. You don't allocate your resources to something so volatile at the risk of wasting them or not be ready on time as a side effect.

          Fedora devs don't care because they use vanilla Gnome and their niche is devs, so they don't bother with user-friendliness. Plus it's 75% RH anyway, hence they go hand in hand.
          But for other distros (non-rolling), this is an issue.
          Even on Manjaro unstable (rolling release), I'm still on Gnome 40. And that's OK.

          The reason of that version behind (it's always been so) is stemming from how Ubuntu release dates and Gnome release dates are intertwined, in a way that is problematic for Ubuntu (Ubuntufeature freeze during Gnome development cycle and not after).

          So please stop trolling now.
          Last edited by Mez'; 15 October 2021, 01:29 PM.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

            That argument is BS anyway. Google uses Gentoo as a base for ChromeOS and Valve uses Arch as a base for the new SteamOS. So anyone claiming most end users and corporate should not use bleeding edge is out of their minds as the aformentioned two large (!) companies are using and pushing bleeding edge.
            Valve based SteamOS 3.0 on Arch yes, but that does not mean that SteamOS 3.0 will be a rolling distro, for all we know this will be a Valve controlled fork. Regardless, the steam client presents a stable ABI/API to games via the steam runtime that is separate from the OS so this is not going to be a rolling distro experience for the application/game devs.

            Neither are ChromeOS a valid argument for a rolling distro here, as a dev you don't target the underlying Gentoo based system but the ChromeOS SDK (aka Android) and that is not rolling.

            I think that you don't have much experience working with enterprises, I happen to do that (in the financial sector) and there every single patch from a vendor are first put through a QA process by each enterprise individually and that is a process that can take weeks. There is not a single end user on any of those systems that click yes on any distro-updates, all is scheduled in blocks by their IT departments.

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            • #46
              Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

              So you keep on using an old distro forever? 'Cause as soon as you upgrade to a newer version of your distro, things will change anyway.
              One of the largest press releasefirms (they handle press release distribution for listed companies) in the world just sent me an install package for a new version of their server software, it was built for RHEL 4.

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              • #47
                Originally posted by Mario Junior View Post
                5xxx series are broken on silicon. There's nothing you can do with software to solve this.
                Not exactly. I suspect a lot of AIB makers produced shoddy cards because they cheaped out on power handling and the 5700xt was very temperamental. But I never had any problems with mine that weren’t software issues, and the AMD Linux team were helpful to get those wrinkles ironed out.

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                • #48
                  I'm still on 18.04, too lazy to upgrade (though, newer kernel and graphics code). Here is my experience with snap:
                  - opening (deb) GIMP 2.10 takes 1-2 seconds
                  - opening default calculator (snap) just to quickly check something takes ~15 seconds
                  I replaced calculator with MATE version that starts instantly (and also installed whole MATE, as I do not like Gnome shell way of working) and removed all snap stuff. I really do not care for security and any other reasons for snap packages. If the starting of application is slow, no thanks.
                  Question for those who tried newer versions of Ubuntu: Has this situation improved at all?

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                  • #49
                    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

                    So you keep on using an old distro forever? 'Cause as soon as you upgrade to a newer version of your distro, things will change anyway.
                    Yes bassicly. The point is that I decide when change is comming. When Debian 11 was released I had all the time in the world to test the upgrade from Debian10 in a virtual machine. I tested as long untill I was satisfied with the result. Then I decided to upgrade. Not because I had to, because debian 10 is still supported for many years, but just because I wanted to and I knew that everything would continue to work. If it didn't I would still be on Debian 10. I just don't like surprises on my main machine.

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                    • #50
                      Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post

                      One of the largest press releasefirms (they handle press release distribution for listed companies) in the world just sent me an install package for a new version of their server software, it was built for RHEL 4.
                      I quoted someone who was talking about not wanting to upgrade because of UI changes. Software made for older distros is an entirely different argument.

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