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Debian 11.1 Released With Initial Batch Of Fixes

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  • kylew77
    replied
    Originally posted by waxhead View Post

    And I think it is amazing that people do not apparently understand that some bugs may be more critical than others. A memory leak of 1kbyte may be grave if it is in a codepath where this memoryleak is hit often. If it is while initializing a huge program such as gimp or blender it is completely insignificant. Should it be fixed? yes , it it critical, depends. That is why you have release critical bugs and not so grave bugs. A button that is off by a few pixels may perfectly well be delayed to a point release for example. Here is the release notes : https://www.debian.org/News/2021/20211009

    And while the above is mostly polishing , you will of course find a few grave things as well, guess what - everyone does mistakes. I do it , others do it, and you probably do mistakes as well. The most intelligent person I have met in my life (which also was my boss for 10 years) once said that he was going to fire everyone that did not do a mistake , because they did nothing. Think about that , if you do a lot - there will be mistakes no matter what. It is how grave these mistakes are that matter.
    You raise a fair point that my CS teachers where trying to make in university, if you wait till all the bugs are fixed sometimes you will never be able to release the product, so I guess at one point you have to just call it good and release anyways.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustRob
    replied
    Originally posted by waxhead View Post
    ... my boss for 10 years) once said that he was going to fire everyone that did not do a mistake , because they did nothing. Think about that , if you do a lot - there will be mistakes no matter what. It is how grave these mistakes are that matter.
    Thank you for that.

    It explains so much, at several places I know; where there's a core group who've been there for over a decade, they advertise constantly, and a couple of people leave every week. Lots of rework, and procedures with obvious improvements that have been previously suggested many times.

    No offense intended, they can't all be where you are; so I'll assume that none of them are, it's an established practice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    Or just use XanMod, which is a much better Linux kernel than the actual kernel.
    When compared to Debian's generic kernel, I tend to agree with you.

    However, do note that using XanMod introduces quite a severe hit to throughput performance, since it is heavily tweaked towards reducing overall kernel latency.
    Thus your system will definitely 'feel' a lot more responsive, however really demanding software like the incredibly-advanced PS3 emulator called RPCS3 will perform noticeably slower.
    Debian people who are not feeling comfortable with switching kernels can also try out this script named "KTweak", which also changes CFS behavior to favour latency over throughput:

    https://github.com/tytydraco/KTweak

    At the end of the day I settled on Ubuntu's exclusive "lowlatency" kernel option with default CFS values, because my own testing showcased optimal balance between throughput versus latency.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vistaus
    replied
    Originally posted by DeeK View Post

    Perhaps pin your system to the stable/bullseye release, and then install the kernel from the testing/bookworm release?
    https://wiki.debian.org/AptConfiguration

    You'll get kernel version 5.14.9 that way. Hopefully that should be fine.
    Or just use XanMod, which is a much better Linux kernel than the actual kernel.

    Leave a comment:


  • ari55
    replied
    Originally posted by piorunz View Post
    When I was on Manjaro, I had crashes daily and had do hard reboot.
    I'm on Manjaro/KDE with kernel 5.4 and I don't have crashes at all, what kernel were you using ?

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkG
    replied
    Oh, so that's why! Just yesterday I assembled a new machine (ASRock B550M-itx/ac, 5700G ($109+$299 at MicroCenter)), and when I got to the point of adding the OBS repo for ungoogled-chromium last night, the "apt update + apt upgrade" brought down a ton of stuff. I run several Debian VMs, but this is my first native Debian install, and begins my migration away from Ubuntu.

    BTW, this snappy-fast new box idles at 18-20W, at the wall according to my trusty Seasonic Power Angel, but wicks up well over 200W when it gets busy. Perhaps during half-time of a football game, I'll bring up the Phoronix Test Suite as part of my "acceptance, break-in testing".

    Leave a comment:


  • WizardGed
    replied
    Originally posted by partcyborg View Post

    While it is 100% true that you shouldnt mix and mix and match arbitrary packages from multiple Debian versions unless you know what you are doing, the Linux kernel packages are a very different story because
    A) they never have dependencies.
    B) any two can be installed at the same time without conflicting with each other
    C) there are (almost) never differences between different Debian releases for a given kernel release.


    While technically correct I've seen issues with dkms and external kernel modules that break between kernel versions and typically (though not always!) the people who are asking for help don't know this or how to check or back out/revert an upgrade with apt. They also tend to come in with stories like "I installed nvidia-dkms and my install broke, I'm on current stable and only have Debian packages installed!!!! Help!" leading to painful issues in IRC/matrix/whateverthecrazykidsareusingtoday. In short for the more experienced user then sure you could do that, I'd be more likely to point an experienced user to https://kernel-team.pages.debian.net...ommon-official where they can figure out how to take an upstream kernel source and apply the Debian patches to them.
    Last edited by WizardGed; 10 October 2021, 05:54 AM. Reason: Forgot to quote :)

    Leave a comment:


  • partcyborg
    replied
    Originally posted by WizardGed View Post

    Please Don't encourage FrankenDebian 's It's asking for pain and suffering long term and isn't supported. Also for the fools among us that do try and help other users it tends to make very difficult to solve problems messing around with pin priority.
    While it is 100% true that you shouldnt mix and mix and match arbitrary packages from multiple Debian versions unless you know what you are doing, the Linux kernel packages are a very different story because
    A) they never have dependencies.
    B) any two can be installed at the same time without conflicting with each other
    C) there are (almost) never differences between different Debian releases for a given kernel release.

    Leave a comment:


  • WizardGed
    replied
    Originally posted by DeeK View Post

    Perhaps pin your system to the stable/bullseye release, and then install the kernel from the testing/bookworm release?
    https://wiki.debian.org/AptConfiguration

    You'll get kernel version 5.14.9 that way. Hopefully that should be fine.
    Please Don't encourage FrankenDebian 's It's asking for pain and suffering long term and isn't supported. Also for the fools among us that do try and help other users it tends to make very difficult to solve problems messing around with pin priority.

    Leave a comment:


  • waxhead
    replied
    Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
    Amazing that even with their hard freeze and bug smashing they still have to release a point release so soon because of bugs!
    And I think it is amazing that people do not apparently understand that some bugs may be more critical than others. A memory leak of 1kbyte may be grave if it is in a codepath where this memoryleak is hit often. If it is while initializing a huge program such as gimp or blender it is completely insignificant. Should it be fixed? yes , it it critical, depends. That is why you have release critical bugs and not so grave bugs. A button that is off by a few pixels may perfectly well be delayed to a point release for example. Here is the release notes : https://www.debian.org/News/2021/20211009

    And while the above is mostly polishing , you will of course find a few grave things as well, guess what - everyone does mistakes. I do it , others do it, and you probably do mistakes as well. The most intelligent person I have met in my life (which also was my boss for 10 years) once said that he was going to fire everyone that did not do a mistake , because they did nothing. Think about that , if you do a lot - there will be mistakes no matter what. It is how grave these mistakes are that matter.

    Leave a comment:

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