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Ubuntu 21.10 Beta Released

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  • Ubuntu 21.10 Beta Released

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 21.10 Beta Released

    Canonical has released the final beta of next month's Ubuntu 21.10 "Impish Indri" release...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...ntu-21.10-Beta

  • #2
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Ubuntu 21.10 is powered by the Linux 5.13 kernel (sadly not 5.14), upgrades to the GCC 11 compiler along with other toolchain updates, and has a wealth of other improvements. On the desktop side, Ubuntu 21.10 features GNOME 40.
    5.13? That's EOL. They've been making terrible kernel decisions. 5.8 also is what they were also using for the AMD package.

    I actually tried supporting 5.8 kernel in my script. Didn't boot. Wasted my time. But at least now I know.

    Sorry to be annoying, but they should really start abiding by these kernel rules:

    mainline: 5.15-rc2 2021-09-20
    stable: 5.14.7 2021-09-22
    stable: 5.13.19 [EOL] 2021-09-18
    longterm: 5.10.68 2021-09-22
    longterm: 5.4.148 2021-09-22

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    • #3
      Too late. Fedora 34 users enjoyed all those and ready to move on.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by perpetually high View Post

        Sorry to be annoying, but they should really start abiding by these kernel rules:

        mainline: 5.15-rc2 2021-09-20
        stable: 5.14.7 2021-09-22
        stable: 5.13.19 [EOL] 2021-09-18
        longterm: 5.10.68 2021-09-22
        longterm: 5.4.148 2021-09-22
        Maybe they are pretenting to be a redhat which could only be in their dreams. I am not blaming redhat for using outdated non-LTS kernels. They have their own resources to tailor whatever they see fit. Ubuntu, I don't think so. I would pick debian sid over any ubuntu recent release blindly.

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        • #5
          Cool story bro.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SkyWarrior View Post
            I would pick debian sid over any ubuntu recent release blindly.
            Good enough for you & serves you right at the same time!

            Now, for something actually interesting:

            Hopefully Canonical can ask/beg/force/coerce/blackmail GregKH into declaring Linux 5.16 as the next LTS release, even though it most likely will get finalized in mid-January 2022, missing the end-of-year cutoff rule for picking the next LTS version by only a few weeks at the latest!

            Certainly would be good news for Ubuntu 22.04 LTS!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by perpetually high View Post

              5.13? That's EOL. They've been making terrible kernel decisions. 5.8 also is what they were also using for the AMD package.
              Historically, Ubuntu tends to do that. One of my biggest Ubuntu peeves is that they always seem to be one point release away from a kernel with longer support.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                Historically, Ubuntu tends to do that. One of my biggest Ubuntu peeves is that they always seem to be one point release away from a kernel with longer support.
                If they are the ones doing the heavy lift work of back-porting security/bug stuff, what is the problem for the typical Ubuntu end user?

                I can see the issue of brand new hardware support, tough. But again, they do provide packaged kernel releases, for those wanting bleeding edge kernels.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

                  If they are the ones doing the heavy lift work of back-porting security/bug stuff, what is the problem for the typical Ubuntu end user?

                  I can see the issue of brand new hardware support, tough. But again, they do provide packaged kernel releases, for those wanting bleeding edge kernels.
                  It's a mix of hardware support and not necessarily getting all the things that get backported to all the other LTS releases. I've looked at the amount of kernel patches that distributions like Ubuntu and SUSE use and it's crazy. That's all their heavy lift work and picking LTS should reduce that since upstream Linux will do it for them.

                  End-user side, an Ubuntu user has to know enough about kernels to know to switch to HWE or to install a newer kernel. Me or you? fine. The average person? We're not there yet. That's why Steam picked Arch and Windows switched to rolling release...basically removing the choice by forcing people onto HWE and upstream from the get-go. (Please ignore LTSC)

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                  • #10
                    glibc is the latest 2.34

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