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Fedora 35 To Support Restarting User Services On Package Upgrades

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  • Fedora 35 To Support Restarting User Services On Package Upgrades

    Phoronix: Fedora 35 To Support Restarting User Services On Package Upgrades

    While Fedora currently allows restarting of system services automatically when upgrading the packages for those services, there hasn't been that capability for user services to automatically restart as part of RPM package upgrades. But now approved for Fedora 35 is that change...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...ervice-Restart

  • #2
    The problem with .deb and .rpm is that they're not sandboxed and are free to do anything.
    On Android, iOS and Universal Windows Platform (UWP) the applications have to ask permissions that you can allow deny.

    With RPM an application can access your webcamera, access your location, access the network, access Bluetooth, etc.

    With Snap and Flatpak you can sandbox applications, but I believe that each Snap gets mounted at system boot time hence adds time to the startup time of the system.

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    • #3
      What if sshd restarts suddenly? Or if a media player is running while updating audio server?
      Or if network restarts?
      Care needs to be taken by package maintainers.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Etherman View Post
        What if sshd restarts suddenly? Or if a media player is running while updating audio server?
        Or if network restarts?
        Care needs to be taken by package maintainers.
        With sshd this never was a problem as open connections keep working.
        you usually want a service restart after a update. otherwise you'll get undefined behavior which is much worse than a restart.

        updates in such environments are usually planned too

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        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post
          The problem with .deb and .rpm is that they're ...
          NO!

          The problem is, that people like you have chosen the wrong system. If you prefer to use sandboxed programs, then you might be better off with one of the systems you named.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Candy View Post

            NO!

            The problem is, that people like you have chosen the wrong system. If you prefer to use sandboxed programs, then you might be better off with one of the systems you named.
            A "freedom" advocate appeared. Obviously freedom only for people who think like you.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ColdDistance View Post

              A "freedom" advocate appeared. Obviously freedom only for people who think like you.
              WTF?
              You stated a problem and he told you a solution.

              but i guess you have the freedom to use what you dont like and complain about it

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              • #8
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                The problem with .deb and .rpm is that they're not sandboxed and are free to do anything.
                On Android, iOS and Universal Windows Platform (UWP) the applications have to ask permissions that you can allow deny.

                With RPM an application can access your webcamera, access your location, access the network, access Bluetooth, etc.

                With Snap and Flatpak you can sandbox applications, but I believe that each Snap gets mounted at system boot time hence adds time to the startup time of the system.
                They could adopt Ubuntu Touch's Click system. Since Ubuntu Touch is Linux, porting to other distros should be fairly easy and you do get the benefits of sandboxing, permission prompts, etc.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by flower View Post

                  WTF?
                  You stated a problem and he told you a solution.

                  but i guess you have the freedom to use what you dont like and complain about it
                  Well it can be I'm wrong because my understanding about English is not very well, but if I understood correctly, Candy simply pointed to uid313 to go away from Linux because Candy doesn't like Snap and Flatpak.

                  Snap and Flatpak exist and are usable (although I don't like Snap because I consider it a vendor lock), so if you don't like those package formats, explain why they are wrong, promote distros that rejected systemd, Flaptak and Snap (because for Unix people they are "windowsing" Linux), try to be constructive.

                  I use Fedora Workstation and I like systemd and Flatpak. If your arguments against those technologies are based on "if you want to systemd and Flatpak, go to Windows", sorry, but for me it's very intolerant.

                  GPL licenses were created to protect user freedom against developers and specially corporations, so I think I'm free to use GPL software under the circumstances I want (Flatpak and sytemd are released under LGPLv2), but many people, specially from Unix movement, think they are the owner of software libre movement, so they think they are legitimate to expel other people from using Linux, specially if they are advocate of systemd, Flatpak and Snap.

                  Finally, I'm so sorry if I didn't understand the Candy's comment correctly, but this comment is based on what I understood about its comment.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ColdDistance View Post
                    ... because Candy doesn't like Snap and Flatpak.
                    This is not exactly true. The idea of Sandboxing is interesting. Android and iOS definately are doing it right. Flatpak is sold to the people as an equal approach but they forget mentioning, that by using Flatpaks you require to install one or more runtimes to get things going. At the end you need to pull in plenty of gigabytes of runtimes to operate one tiny Flatpack packaged app. Not to mention about the huge abuse of links that get created inside /var/lib/flatpak. So you basicly end up installing a Linux system inside a Linux system.

                    So the initial poster can't compare apples with pears to say so.

                    And even if the initial poster claims that these solutions are the ones he prefer, then it would be simply wrong from me to not advise the person to chose Android or iOS or even Windows where he (or she) could benefit from all this as of today.

                    Oh and by the way. Neither rpm or deb accesses any of the things that the initial poster claimed here.

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