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Slackware 15.0 Coming Soon With RC1 Released

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  • gilboa
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    Slackware was maybe my first Linux distribution, I also an early version of Red Hat and Corel Linux that I got on a CD when I bought a PC magazine.
    I learnt a lot about Linux using Slackware.

    It was quite easy to mess it up though, the package manager had no dependency resolution. But it was fun building your own kernels.
    Same here.
    It was my first Linux distro (93?) before switching to RedHat (and now Fedora) Linux.
    Kept using it from from time to time on low-spec machines and appliance up until 14.2 started getting stale.

    That said, I welcome 15.0 and plan to start testing it again once its released.
    Last edited by gilboa; 25 August 2021, 11:39 AM.

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  • ParisStaltic
    replied
    No biggie vw_fan17. Recently as we approach a new full release the number of updates have been massive and frequent and several started thinking of Current as a rolling release. The distinction between "development" and "rolling" is blurry but of some importance, so there is some importance in keeping it straight since we will likely have some new people trying out Slackware. Someone expecting a rolling release would likely find Slackware boring since it requires so little work once setup.

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  • vw_fan17
    replied
    Originally posted by ParisStaltic View Post
    vw_fan17 we must live in different dimensions because Slackware is not now nor has ever been a rolling release. Current is like Testing, though extremely stable, gets updated frequently because it is a development release. Some people like it as a "snapshot" system and rarely participate in the update process but the Official Full Releases mainly only update as security patches as they become available. If you have been a longtime Slacker you might enjoy visiting the LinuxQuestionsNetwork which has a few dozen distro subsections but has a superb Slackware community. Patrick posts and answers there as well as AlienBob, Robbie Workman, and other deep developers. The quality is basically without peer.
    Well, dang.. It's been so long since I worried much about distributions (I've essentially used Slackware for 25 years, a few others briefly 15+ years ago), that I mis-used the term. My bad.

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  • ParisStaltic
    replied
    vw_fan17 we must live in different dimensions because Slackware is not now nor has ever been a rolling release. Current is like Testing, though extremely stable, gets updated frequently because it is a development release. Some people like it as a "snapshot" system and rarely participate in the update process but the Official Full Releases mainly only update as security patches as they become available. If you have been a longtime Slacker you might enjoy visiting the LinuxQuestionsNetwork which has a few dozen distro subsections but has a superb Slackware community. Patrick posts and answers there as well as AlienBob, Robbie Workman, and other deep developers. The quality is basically without peer.

    Leave a comment:


  • vw_fan17
    replied
    And there was much rejoicing from long-time Slackware users like me! I can't remember if I used SLS or Slackware for my very first Linux install in 1994 or 1995, but I've been almost exclusively Slackware since for my daily / desktop. I still have some windows boxes for gaming, etc, but Slack on a daily basis. Makes me happy!

    Edit: I should also point out - while 14.0 was a long time ago, there have been 14.1 and 14.2 releases in the meantime. 14.2 to 15.0 HAS been a while - IIRC, 14.2 was around 2018 - but it's not like there's been NOTHING happening for 10 years. Plus, Slack is a rolling release, so anytime someone can upgrade to "current" to get an updated system..
    Last edited by vw_fan17; 17 August 2021, 10:16 AM.

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  • ParisStaltic
    replied
    All I want from an OpSys is to never have anything run that I didn't allow or initiate. That one caveat saves so much time and offers so much power. I'm going to occasionally screw up but that's not a big problem when I only have to retrace one or 2 steps, and that connection makes me learn to "get gud". Automated dependency resolution is a crutch. I spend far less time handling dependencies in Slackware than I do chasing faults in automation that somebody else wrote up. The worst that can happen when building an app in Slack is that one app won't launch or run correctly. Other apps, let alone the Base System is never at risk. I like that

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  • kaidenshi
    replied
    Originally posted by AJSB View Post
    My favourite Linux Distro. in fact, the only that i use.
    I use it where I can (including this machine), otherwise it's Void Linux or OpenBSD depending on the use case. Slackware is great when you need Linux and you want "everything and the kitchen sink", Void is better for Linux in a minimalist environment where you can start small and build up, and OpenBSD is just a joy to use on Thinkpad laptops, servers, and embedded devices.

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  • AJSB
    replied
    My favourite Linux Distro. in fact, the only that i use.

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  • kaidenshi
    replied
    "While Slackware is one of the oldest still-maintained Linux distributions out there"
    It's not just "one of the oldest", it is the oldest.

    https://opensource.com/article/18/7/stackware-turns-25

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  • Nille_kungen
    replied
    I updated Slackware64-current to RC1 earlier today.

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