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Debian GNU/Hurd 2021 Released With Experimental Rump-Based Userland Disk Driver, Go Port

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  • Debian GNU/Hurd 2021 Released With Experimental Rump-Based Userland Disk Driver, Go Port

    Phoronix: Debian GNU/Hurd 2021 Released With Experimental Rump-Based Userland Disk Driver, Go Port

    In addition to Debian GNU/Linux 11 set for release today, Debian GNU/Hurd 2021 has been released as the unofficial port of Debian to the GNU Hurd micro-kernel...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...-GNU-Hurd-2021

  • #2
    But does it run Linux?

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    • #3
      I can't believe they still have motivation to keep developing it. Even some random hobbyist OSes are more useful and powerful than Hurd.
      But i don't see any Debian GNU/Haiku, Debian GNU/Toaru nor Debian GNU/Helen.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by StarterX4 View Post
        I can't believe they still have motivation to keep developing it.
        They used to say the same thing about Linux. Some people are just highly motivated. Without them, we would all be stuck with "Windows in cloud" as the only option!

        Have you tried it? It works remarkably well. Obviously drivers are lacking (as with the Linux libre kernel) but in a Qemu VM it really is a very viable system. Especially these days I only run web browsers remotely via VNC.

        It is great that this could be in place if Linux and BSD ever drop the ball.
        Last edited by kpedersen; 14 August 2021, 11:45 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

          Have you tried it? It works remarkably well. Obviously drivers are lacking (as with the Linux libre kernel) but in a Qemu VM it really is a very viable system. Especially these days I only run web browsers remotely via VNC.

          It is great that this could be in place if Linux and BSD ever drop the ball.
          Do you run it on real hard ware? Or in qemu? I'm guessing qemu. I've seen some adventurous people running it on real hardware. I'd like to be one of those people some day.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by StarterX4 View Post
            I can't believe they still have motivation to keep developing it. Even some random hobbyist OSes are more useful and powerful than Hurd.
            But i don't see any Debian GNU/Haiku, Debian GNU/Toaru nor Debian GNU/Helen.
            The why is quite simple, if Hurd works, its an incredibly powerful system. It is so far the most ambitious micro kernel project and it seems to be the only one actually running that is a pure-blood micro kernel unixoid.

            The question is if this power is needed, compared to Linux. But still, very interesting very ambitious project that also shows how flawed the micro kernel concept is if you try to realize it in the real world. It likely is where it is now due to its adoption of the flawed mach microkernel instead of baking something good in house.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by StarterX4 View Post
              I can't believe they still have motivation to keep developing it. Even some random hobbyist OSes are more useful and powerful than Hurd.
              But i don't see any Debian GNU/Haiku, Debian GNU/Toaru nor Debian GNU/Helen.
              Debian GNU/DOS

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jbranso View Post

                Do you run it on real hard ware? Or in qemu? I'm guessing qemu. I've seen some adventurous people running it on real hardware. I'd like to be one of those people some day.
                So far I have only played with it in Qemu. It is similar to Plan 9 (and 9front). Really interesting systems but hardware support lets it down as a day to day driver.

                Frustratingly no hardware company has stepped up to the plate to develop really compatible (slow moving) hardware emulating something like Qemu. Obviously there is no money in this. Strange because things like MisterFPGA make some decent cash providing MS-DOS compatible hardware. Perhaps this will change in the future as we get more people interested in technical computing rather than just sucking from AppStores.

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                • #9
                  The best OS continues to get better!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

                    Debian GNU/DOS
                    You joke, but that almost exists https://sourceforge.net/projects/gnudos/

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