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Debian 11.0 "Bullseye" Gets An August Release Date

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  • Debian 11.0 "Bullseye" Gets An August Release Date

    Phoronix: Debian 11.0 "Bullseye" Gets An August Release Date

    The Debian release team has just announced their planned release date for Debian 11...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...1-Release-Date

  • #2
    It is hard to say how much I appreciate Debian. It is all there for free too. The distribution is rock solid and contrary to popular belief not outdated at all - give it a spin, you will not regret it.

    That being said , I think that more benchmarks and hardware review should use Debian (and RedHat/Fedora) as a base. Debian is *the* mother distro of them all so if it works well on Debian chances are it will work fine on descendants (which include Ubuntu as well just for the record).

    http://www.dirtcellar.net

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    • #3
      Originally posted by waxhead View Post
      It is hard to say how much I appreciate Debian. It is all there for free too. The distribution is rock solid and contrary to popular belief not outdated at all - give it a spin, you will not regret it.

      That being said , I think that more benchmarks and hardware review should use Debian (and RedHat/Fedora) as a base. Debian is *the* mother distro of them all so if it works well on Debian chances are it will work fine on descendants (which include Ubuntu as well just for the record).
      Debian is cool & all, but only as a server OS!

      Tell me, why does [in your opinion the inferior distro] Ubuntu offer me the option of a "lowlatency" kernel, while Debian gives me only one officially supported Linux kernel choice?
      (250 Hz + only voluntary preemption, i.e. "highlatency")

      Comment


      • #4
        With all respect to Quaridarium, "new" hardware from four years ago not working is a fairly big black mark against Debian in my book. I've been using it for eight years for my home server and it's suited me quite well, but I also use several third-party package repositories because two or three years can be an eternity depending on the software you rely on, not to mention sheer chance when major releases of something you use happen just after a Debian feature freeze.

        Debian does offer some unique advantages (for example debconf and dbconfig-common are wonderful tools for any system administrator, whether the system is a server or a personal workstation), but the more I use other distributions, the less I like it overall.

        Fortunately we are all spoiled for choice, and there's room enough in this world for lots of different options. Debian fills its niche, and has done so without fanfare for decades. I'll always appreciate it for that.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by J.King View Post
          With all respect to Quaridarium, "new" hardware from four years ago not working is a fairly big black mark against Debian in my book. I've been using it for eight years for my home server and it's suited me quite well, but I also use several third-party package repositories because two or three years can be an eternity depending on the software you rely on, not to mention sheer chance when major releases of something you use happen just after a Debian feature freeze.

          Debian does offer some unique advantages (for example debconf and dbconfig-common are wonderful tools for any system administrator, whether the system is a server or a personal workstation), but the more I use other distributions, the less I like it overall.

          Fortunately we are all spoiled for choice, and there's room enough in this world for lots of different options. Debian fills its niche, and has done so without fanfare for decades. I'll always appreciate it for that.
          With the backports being officially supported, it is very easy to make sure current hardware runs on Debian, install the backported kernel and nvidia drivers, and you're set. Though I'm genuinely too lazy and sid / testing is stable enough for desktop use, that is what I usually use there. I use stable on servers generally, but it'd make a perfectly fine desktop with some backport packages.

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          • #6
            Latest Debian 11 testing iso.

            My spec. is CPU= AMD ryzen 2700x , GPU= AMD Vega 56 ...

            I didnt run any apps but my Amd vega 56, red lights constantly on. GPU themp is 74-80 degree. GPU doesnt speed up to cool down GPU!
            Be careful you may lose your GPU.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

              Debian is cool & all, but only as a server OS!

              Tell me, why does [in your opinion the inferior distro] Ubuntu offer me the option of a "lowlatency" kernel, while Debian gives me only one officially supported Linux kernel choice?
              (250 Hz + only voluntary preemption, i.e. "highlatency")
              I disagree that Debian is only a server OS. While it is rather excellent as a server OS it also works quite well for Desktop use.

              Speaking of course only for myself, I do not need a low latency kernel for Debian. I suspect the low latency kernel is mostly useful for audio / video production. I make music (OpenMPT on top of wine) and edit a little bit of videos (admittedly not often) in Openshot, and I have never run into latency issues even with my now ageing Core 2 Duo E6600 and 4GB RAM.

              And just for the record, you are correct that I believe Ubuntu to be inferior - I base this simply on the fact that every time I tried it (years in between) I always run into issues such as crashes, weird behavior or simply stuff that did not work at all. Essentially it all smells of bad QA. It has been a couple of years since I tried so perhaps I'll give it a spin and see how it is , maybe it has gotten better from a pure users perspective, but I suspect that I will stick with Debian for many many years to come.

              May I ask what you need / use the low latency kernel for?

              http://www.dirtcellar.net

              Comment


              • #8
                Time to put on the asbestos pants! Once the new stable Debian version is released will a new testing release start, which often means that within the first few months will we see distro-breaking features being introduced, which have been held back for obvious reasons. The beginning of a new testing cycle is always a fun time for users of Debian testing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Qaridarium
                  i failed to install debian10 on it. Debian11 finally mostly works but the installer has bugs the last time i checked.
                  I successfully used Buster installer and edited sources.list for a running Bullseye desktop on two zen3 devices -- one mobile apu, and one desktop cpu + amd rdna ws card. Worked surprisingly painlessly.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by waxhead View Post

                    I disagree that Debian is only a server OS. While it is rather excellent as a server OS it also works quite well for Desktop use.

                    Speaking of course only for myself, I do not need a low latency kernel for Debian. I suspect the low latency kernel is mostly useful for audio / video production. I make music (OpenMPT on top of wine) and edit a little bit of videos (admittedly not often) in Openshot, and I have never run into latency issues even with my now ageing Core 2 Duo E6600 and 4GB RAM.

                    And just for the record, you are correct that I believe Ubuntu to be inferior - I base this simply on the fact that every time I tried it (years in between) I always run into issues such as crashes, weird behavior or simply stuff that did not work at all. Essentially it all smells of bad QA. It has been a couple of years since I tried so perhaps I'll give it a spin and see how it is , maybe it has gotten better from a pure users perspective, but I suspect that I will stick with Debian for many many years to come.

                    May I ask what you need / use the low latency kernel for?
                    Actually, the main reason why I am always using Ubuntu's "lowlatency" kernel flavor is because Google is doing the same across their ecosystem (Android + ChromeOS + Stadia). [Of course I'm talking about a similar kernel config here, so 1000 Hz timer tick + full PREEMPT!] I assume they have their sane reasons for doing so.

                    The point is that a fully preemptible kernel will always prioritize user-space software, which is what really matters for any (you guessed it) user!

                    Once you've switched over and then look back, you'll realize (and probably also 'feel') the difference!

                    What's really sad though is that even among Linux users there are so few of us that seem to care about this... (Just take a look @ https://www.protondb.com/)

                    Anyway, here is at least a quote from another satisfied "lowlatency" renegade that I could find:
                    I have this old laptop with dual AMD A6-4400M at 1600MHz, that I use sparingly when I'm out of the office, mainly to read email and browse casual web sites. There was something, possibly connected with software updates, which makes it unresponsive. Something like typing a dozen characters without seeing the first one. Often the widget asking whether I should force-quit a process.

                    After sudo apt-get install linux-lowlatency and reboot, it became smooth and responsive. (uname -r 5.0.0-20-lowlatency.) Wonderful, I should have switched years ago. Let me stress Seven's answer: unless you want to squeeze the max out of a number crunching server, go for the -preempt!
                    Maybe one day all other Linux believers will see the light, too!

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