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Fedora 35 Looking To Employ WirePlumber For Managing PipeWire

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  • Fedora 35 Looking To Employ WirePlumber For Managing PipeWire

    Phoronix: Fedora 35 Looking To Employ WirePlumber For Managing PipeWire

    While Fedora 34 successfully shipped with PipeWire for managing audio/video streams and replacing PulseAudio use-cases, with Fedora 35 this autumn the integration around PipeWire should be even better...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...rePlumber-Plan

  • #2
    man, it's hard to keep on track on what's happening on my Linux boxes. Every aspect of the system is getting multilayered with every layer changing all the time.

    being it:
    • device management
    • networking
    • firewall
    • audio
    it is hard to tell which layer is actually doing stuff and which component is reponsible for that layer.

    maybe it's only me getting old

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    • #3
      I hope they patch it before using Wireplumber... I have tried it twice and I uninstalled it within an hour each time... It's still buggy as heck.

      Comment


      • #4
        > WirePlumber is built around GNOME and leverages Lua scripts for customization

        Maybe not for me then...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cynic View Post
          man, it's hard to keep on track on what's happening on my Linux boxes. Every aspect of the system is getting multilayered with every layer changing all the time.

          being it:
          • device management
          • networking
          • firewall
          • audio
          it is hard to tell which layer is actually doing stuff and which component is reponsible for that layer.

          maybe it's only me getting old
          Good for you that you haven't followed the bluetooth story closely. Bluetooth does all of that and then some (including shortcuts, battery reporting, contact sharing, etc).

          Comment


          • #6
            guildem

            Maybe not for me then...
            Ok, noted. đź‘Ť

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by [email protected] View Post

              Good for you that you haven't followed the bluetooth story closely. Bluetooth does all of that and then some (including shortcuts, battery reporting, contact sharing, etc).
              I've used Linux as my only OS since 1998 and I've been through it all, but bluetooth is so painful that I actually removed it from my toughts

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              • #8
                Did WirePlumber maintainers port over to it all changes that were adding accumulating on the pipewire-media-session (the session manager used right now) ? Because if not, that would be a disaster for Fedora. It's been almost half an year before pipewire-media-session learned to switch to headphones by default, so it become more or less usable. And then there were other changes, like not switching over to HDMI output just because you unplugged the headphones… So, lots of work, it just approaches to the quality of PulseAudio output handling, and now they want to switch over once again. I really hope all the changes were ported to WirePlumber.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by guildem View Post
                  > WirePlumber is built around GNOME and leverages Lua scripts for customization

                  Maybe not for me then...
                  The only things it needs are Lua and GLib.
                  The latter apparently doesn't require pulling in the entire GNOME, so it should not be a problem in non-GNOME desktops...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

                    The only things it needs are Lua and GLib.
                    The latter apparently doesn't require pulling in the entire GNOME, so it should not be a problem in non-GNOME desktops...
                    That's better. Glib is what provides the object system and/or event loop used by tons of things written in C, including GStreamer. It's so widely used that, if you do apt-get remove --dry-run libglib2.0-0 on a Kubuntu 20.04 LTS system, it'll propose ripping out a bunch of KDE components because they depend on system services and libraries built on Glib.

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