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Windows 10 Rockets Ahead Of Ubuntu Linux On The Core i9 11900K For Some Workloads

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  • Windows 10 Rockets Ahead Of Ubuntu Linux On The Core i9 11900K For Some Workloads

    Phoronix: Windows 10 Rockets Ahead Of Ubuntu Linux On The Core i9 11900K For Some Workloads

    For those wondering how the Windows vs. Linux performance compares with Intel's new Rocket Lake processors for both the CPU performance and some initial cross-platform exposure for the Xe Graphics, here are some preliminary benchmarks with the Core i9 11900K.

    https://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=30122

  • #2
    Tbh, more mature support on Windows at launch is nothing new. gcc/llvm will close much of that gap within a year, if not sooner.

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    • #3
      what compiler settings were used for creating the benchmark executables on Windows/Linux?

      since most of the benchmarks are heavily CPU bound optimizations might play quite a substantial role

      this feels more like a GCC vs MSVC battle than an OS comparison (excluding the GPU limited benchmarks)

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      • #4
        There are no OS/microcode mitigations active with Rocket Lake on Windows 10, whereas on Linux, as Michael's previous benchmarks have shown, there are. Which once again shows that it's stupid to have "one fits them all" defaults, instead of server vs. consumer/workstation.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
          There are no OS/microcode mitigations active with Rocket Lake on Windows 10, whereas on Linux, as Michael's previous benchmarks have shown, there are. Which once again shows that it's stupid to have "one fits them all" defaults, instead of server vs. consumer/workstation.
          Well, since these are arcane and potentially important settings, the sane default is to enable everything. Server admins who are more in the know can decide what to disable then.

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          • #6
            Yeah, this is Windows not macOS when it comes to pure compute workloads it should be trading blows with Linux, on graphics and other "accelerated" workloads it should be faster, and on filesystem access it'll be slower. If it was macOS then the expectation would be that it'd be trailing far behind on every front.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bug77 View Post

              Well, since these are arcane and potentially important settings, the sane default is to enable everything. Server admins who are more in the know can decide what to disable then.
              Plus in today's world it's better to have a safe over sorry approach. Especially if you have a really new CPU because, worst case scenario, you might drop down to the IPC of a Core2Quad or Phenom. I have it on good Phoronix authority that Core2Quad and Phenom levels of performance are perfectly acceptable in 2021 so what's the problem with having the safety on by default? That said, there's days where you read about the Source Engine exploit where none of the mitigations would have helped because mitigations don't fix buggy code and you wonder "Why bother? Some asshat will just use one of the 385,184 other software exploits anyways".

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              • #8
                I'm shocked to hear that Ubuntu is slow. Shocked I tell you.

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                • #9
                  Nice. I use Windows as main system and like it.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HEL88 View Post
                    Nice. I use Windows as main system and like it.
                    ‚Äč

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