Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Red Hat Announces Free "RHEL For Open-Source Infrastructure"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Red Hat Announces Free "RHEL For Open-Source Infrastructure"

    Phoronix: Red Hat Announces Free "RHEL For Open-Source Infrastructure"

    Last month Red Hat announced no-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux for small production environments while now they have extended their gratis RHEL offering to also include "open-source infrastructure" being entitled to no-cost usage...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Infrastructure

  • #2
    A welcome addition to the program!

    Cheers,
    Mike

    Comment


    • #3
      Eligible organizations will be able to enjoy no-cost RHEL
      In other words: Hoops For Hats

      Seriously though, while I applaud the move I have to reckon that most current users who would use this are already on or planning on going to Rocky.

      Personally, I'd be into something in between Fedora and Stream. I guess that means Stream with something akin to Ubuntu's HWE.

      Comment


      • #4
        meh.

        still looking forward for Rocky Linux.

        Comment


        • #5
          This seems like a very blurry grey area to me. I think a lot of companies who use RHEL for their "open source infra" are gonna get surprise audits and Redhat will find bunch of infra that's not compliant and ding them with license costs and penalties. My whole Intranet is running on an open source stack, so do all my internal server qualify for this? Seems doubtful. Yea, I'd just wait for Rocky and ignore this announcement.

          Comment


          • #6
            Ooh, free handouts!

            This is not quite what open-source is about.

            Comment


            • #7
              An eligibility process and a subscription process, and probably an ongoing eligibility audit process. Wow, that sounds almost as simple as downloading a free ISO and doing whatever you want with it. Gee, thanks IBM!!!! Nothing says "community" quite like centralized control and inefficient bureaucratic processes.

              Comment


              • #8
                Looks like the management people that sunk IBM market share and profits in the last 20 years, is finally penetrating RedHat after the buy. After the move to eliminate CentOS as free clone of RHEL, looks like they didn't expect how the community of CentOS would react. Now they do a remedial action after another like they were in panic.

                RedHat was a very profitable company before the IBM buy. I feel that the "IBM way" of doing things will end up messing them.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                  Phoronix: Red Hat Announces Free "RHEL For Open-Source Infrastructure"

                  Last month Red Hat announced no-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux for small production environments while now they have extended their gratis RHEL offering to also include "open-source infrastructure" being entitled to no-cost usage...

                  http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Infrastructure
                  I think I am going to stick with Debian stable for my servers. At least they won't kill my distro in an attempt to tie me up in a shareware license with asterisks.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                    Personally, I'd be into something in between Fedora and Stream. I guess that means Stream with something akin to Ubuntu's HWE.
                    Is this similar to the CentOS Hyperscale thing?: https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...tOS-Hyperscale
                    See this:

                    The focus with the CentOS Hyperscaler effort is on faster-moving package backports via an opt-in repository that will provide drop-in package updates/replacements. While living more bleeding-edge, these updates are intended for being stable and production use. Among the many packages slated for the Hyperscale repository are more recent versions of systemd. The focus is on package upgrades with the desire for new packages being satisfied by going through Fedora and then to the EPEL repository instead for new packages.
                    I was looking forward to trying this on a workstation as I wouldn't mind a RHEL-based workstation but Fedora is a bit too "fast" for me with the new versions a couple times a year but CentOS never had the extra packages I miss on my workstation (but don't necessarily care about on a server)

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X