Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

EndeavourOS Issues First 2021 Release For Easy-To-Use Arch-Based Linux Distro

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • muncrief
    replied
    Oh, this is fantastic.

    I'm all for getting more Arch in the world but installing pure Arch is beyond the capabilities of many common users, and its raw updates can sometimes break things in a way that non-professionals find difficult to understand or remedy.

    In fact I run Arch on my main desktop and Manjaro on my home theater server, as I need more stability on my server, but the most up to date software on my desktop.

    I will never understand why some Arch users demand that everything be as complicated as possible. I'm more concerned about expanding the Arch, and Linux in general, user base.

    Don't get me wrong, if you're technically proficient enough pure Arch is the way to go for desktops and workstations. I just don't think it's right for everyone, everywhere, all the time.

    And that's where a variety of easier to use, or application targeted, Arch derived distributions fit in.
    Last edited by muncrief; 26 February 2021, 12:11 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • halo9en
    replied
    Originally posted by CTown View Post
    I eventually nuked the [perfectly working] install for Tumbleweed (which I see myself using for the rest of my life).
    Why? (just curious)

    Leave a comment:


  • Aryma
    replied
    Originally posted by aspen View Post

    The word "Manjaro" makes me say yes, because anything Manjaro does should never be used as a "how-to" guide, especially for making an installer.
    what is wrong with Manjaro installer ?

    Leave a comment:


  • cacarr
    replied
    In addition to Endeavor you might check out RebornOS, which started out as basically a fork of Antergos -- by the guy who handled Deepin DE stuff for Antergos back in the day. Has some useful tools.

    But yeah, Manjaro is a good way to go for a primary production machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • stingray454
    replied
    I'm still on Antergos (mainly because it's working great and I cba to resinstall), and I'm really happy with the "simplified arch installation" distros. I tried standard Arch, but I don't really see the reason to do something manually that can be simply automated.

    I will probably go with Manjaro though, as I will be moving to using Linux for my main work computer, and honestly the arch stability isn't great. I mean, I have an issue maybe once every 6 months, but it happens. I think Manjaro is a good in-between with pretty much Arch experience but more stable packages. But really happy to see there's alternatives, Endeavour would be my next pick.

    Leave a comment:


  • linuxforall
    replied
    Endeavour is quite polished and organized for a first timer to get closest to pure Arch experience and for those needed a pure Arch installer there are scripts around that make the job quite easy for quick repetitive installs and one good one with a good interface that does the job well and starts with the most important sync of mirrors via Reflector is Anarchy, pure Arch with easy stress free install that doesn't fail.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    This is nice, I accidentally deleted my home directory again the other day so i think ill try this.

    Leave a comment:


  • aspen
    replied
    Originally posted by Aryma View Post
    to be honest I went arch iso with manjaro architect Installation

    is that too much to ask for
    The word "Manjaro" makes me say yes, because anything Manjaro does should never be used as a "how-to" guide, especially for making an installer.

    Leave a comment:


  • R41N3R
    replied
    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

    Generally it can be scripted. All those commands you made note of whilst researching how to install it in the first place can pretty much be dumped into a script.

    This is also coming from someone who does also agree that Arch should probably have an installer. Not for ease of use, but for consistency. Surely it will help the Arch developers if their users have similar setups and can report more reproducible bugs?

    Not a stupid installer mind, but a simple one like OpenBSD where you can pretty much just hammer the return key until it is complete. Basically a script, less than 1mb.
    I totally agree. After Antergos passed away and EndeavourOS installer couldn't do what I want (I opened a bug report and got the answer that I can fix it by myself), I wrote my own script. It was a nice learning curve, but to have a generic Arch script to install a standard system with reasonable/basic defaults would be nice.

    Leave a comment:


  • CTown
    replied
    Originally posted by Shiba View Post
    In my opinion if you find it a pain to install Arch, you shouldn't use Arch. Installer or not, It's not a Next -> Next -> Install distro and you'll pay the consequences of not knowing what is going on under the hood when you'll skip some required manual intervention during an upgrade.
    Have you seen the Arch installation guide? It's more or less a series of shell commands. Can you really say with a straight face that it would be impossible to make a stable GUI installer with the info from that page?

    I used Antergos to install Arch Linux. I had the install going for over a year. I never even bothered with the Antergos website after I downloaded the iso. I never had to ask for help as every issue I had (which was pretty rare) was already being discussed on the Arch forum as Antergos used Arch's repositories/packages. I used the Arch wiki when I wanted to install Plymouth or really anything. Every two weeks or so, I looked at the official Arch homepage to see if manual intervention was needed during the update process. The fact that I used the Antergos installer never mattered.

    I eventually nuked the [perfectly working] install for Tumbleweed (which I see myself using for the rest of my life).

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X