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Ubuntu 21.04 To Expand The Use Of Phased Package Updates

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  • Ubuntu 21.04 To Expand The Use Of Phased Package Updates

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 21.04 To Expand The Use Of Phased Package Updates

    With this spring's release of Ubuntu 21.04 there is more widespread use of "phased updates" for gradually rolling out new stable release updates to help avoid any regressions en masse from coming to light. For years the Ubuntu desktop has employed this phased updates strategy while now with it being plumbed into APT, Ubuntu Server and other versions will by default make use of phased updates...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Phased-Updates

  • #2
    "Phased update". I still don't get it.
    mpv 0.33.0 was released on Nov 22, 2020.
    We still don't get that update on Ubuntu 20.10, which is a non-LTS release.

    By introducing this new "phased update", will people get updates in-time?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by pranav View Post
      "Phased update". I still don't get it.
      mpv 0.33.0 was released on Nov 22, 2020.
      We still don't get that update on Ubuntu 20.10, which is a non-LTS release.

      By introducing this new "phased update", will people get updates in-time?
      No, I think this article means gradual rollout so not all people get the updates at the same time.

      The problem with Ubuntu is that it takes 6 months you to get any new releases of any software, and by then it might already be outdated when you get it, because its not updated after the Feature Freeze date in development.

      It seems Windows 10 is the best operating system for those wanting to enjoy the best open source has to offer, then you can always have access to the latest version of Python, LibreOffice, Blender, GIMP, etc. On Ubuntu I am stuck with old versions.

      Comment


      • #4
        Lol. No. Arch or Gentoo will give you a nice rolling release with up-to-date everything. No need to jump to Windows 10. Pick a Arch derivative distro if you want it a little more packaged.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by uid313 View Post

          No, I think this article means gradual rollout so not all people get the updates at the same time.

          The problem with Ubuntu is that it takes 6 months you to get any new releases of any software, and by then it might already be outdated when you get it, because its not updated after the Feature Freeze date in development.

          It seems Windows 10 is the best operating system for those wanting to enjoy the best open source has to offer, then you can always have access to the latest version of Python, LibreOffice, Blender, GIMP, etc. On Ubuntu I am stuck with old versions.
          Ever used Linux rolling release versions? I have been using Tumbleweed for 3 years, after using Ubuntu for 10 years, I have never had any problems whatsoever and if an update breaks something I can easily undo it with a rollback. So no, Windows isn't better, it's a proprietary OS that I don't want to give away my data to.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rhavenn View Post
            Lol. No. Arch or Gentoo will give you a nice rolling release with up-to-date everything. No need to jump to Windows 10. Pick a Arch derivative distro if you want it a little more packaged.
            +1 personally I like Manjaro since it's easier to use than arch with most of the benefits, it reminds me a bit of the early days of what Ubuntu was like to Debian.

            Another option if you like Ubuntu but want something a bit more up to date, take a look at Pop!_OS
            "Note that feature development in Pop!_OS is not exclusive to any particular point release, as we follow a rolling-release strategy for updates to projects which we maintain. This means that features are added to Pop!_OS as soon as they are finished, instead of being withheld to the next point release." https://support.system76.com/articles/roadmap/

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by vandelay View Post

              +1 personally I like Manjaro since it's easier to use than arch with most of the benefits, it reminds me a bit of the early days of what Ubuntu was like to Debian.

              Another option if you like Ubuntu but want something a bit more up to date, take a look at Pop!_OS
              "Note that feature development in Pop!_OS is not exclusive to any particular point release, as we follow a rolling-release strategy for updates to projects which we maintain. This means that features are added to Pop!_OS as soon as they are finished, instead of being withheld to the next point release." https://support.system76.com/articles/roadmap/
              It's also a great OS if you're into latex sales.

              Comment


              • #8
                So apt has this new feature but is not "stabe" so servers are using scriptable apt-get which is missing the feature?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post

                  No, I think this article means gradual rollout so not all people get the updates at the same time.

                  The problem with Ubuntu is that it takes 6 months you to get any new releases of any software, and by then it might already be outdated when you get it, because its not updated after the Feature Freeze date in development.

                  It seems Windows 10 is the best operating system for those wanting to enjoy the best open source has to offer, then you can always have access to the latest version of Python, LibreOffice, Blender, GIMP, etc. On Ubuntu I am stuck with old versions.
                  You're not stuck. That's what snap and flatpak are for.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jacob View Post

                    You're not stuck. That's what snap and flatpak are for.
                    Flatpak and Snap have been a pretty shitty experience with themes not applied, slow app startup, and huge downloads and installs of runtimes, dependencies and packages.

                    Comment

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