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OpenSUSE Leap 15.3 Alpha Released

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  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.3 Alpha Released

    Phoronix: OpenSUSE Leap 15.3 Alpha Released

    With openSUSE Jump progressing as a closer marriage of SUSE Linux Enterprise and openSUSE Leap, for those on the openSUSE Leap 15 stable series the first alpha builds of 15.3 are now available for testing...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...eap-15.3-Alpha

  • #2
    I tested OpenSUSE tumbleweed yesterday; the installer and boot was surprisingly slow and missing progress indicators....
    (compared to any of the other main distributions I tested)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by elatllat View Post
      I tested OpenSUSE tumbleweed yesterday; the installer and boot was surprisingly slow and missing progress indicators....
      (compared to any of the other main distributions I tested)
      I agree, their installation and boot process is way slower than other distributions nowadays. They simply haven't optimized these as good yet and thus fell behind during the last couple of years.

      On the other hand, I seem to come back to Tumbleweed every so often. I get a Chromium integrated with VAAPI patches there, the distro is usually well-tested and I can compile a custom kernel as a package quite easily. The only downside is that I couldn't get llvm-polly to work, the package seems to be broken.

      I tried the new Manjaro release yesterday but couldn't work around a SSL certificate error which prevented me from upgrading to the newest packages. Picking other mirrors didn't help as they lacked three packages which were newer and pacman refused to update entirely. Great! I haven't had these kind of issues with Tumbleweed and similiar issues two to three times with Manjaro during the last few years already. Manjaro just isn't polished enough it seems (btw I didn't encounter this issue with RC1 and RC2, just the release version).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by elatllat View Post
        I tested OpenSUSE tumbleweed yesterday; the installer and boot was surprisingly slow and missing progress indicators....
        (compared to any of the other main distributions I tested)
        less then 15 minutes on a old i5 third generation.....

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        • #5
          OpenSUSE Leap 15.3 is "based on the Jump concept" and does provide "a whole new level of harmony"...
          Seems like openSUSE is still struggling with its identity and where it fits in the LInux market.

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          • #6
            I can only recommend this distribution which has the best Btrfs integration!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by marccollin View Post

              less then 15 minutes on a old i5 third generation.....
              Probably want to also consider network speed? Or is that not relevant with tumbleweed installs?

              Originally posted by Steffo View Post
              I can only recommend this distribution which has the best Btrfs integration!
              Besides Snapper + Grub, what else is it doing with BTRFS? I'm aware of some maintenance scripts.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by polarathene View Post
                Besides Snapper + Grub, what else is it doing with BTRFS? I'm aware of some maintenance scripts.
                Snapper is a big deal. Second, SUSE has Btrfs developers. This is the reason why it supports the filesystem and Red Hat not. Also Canonical doesn't support Btrfs it well.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by polarathene View Post

                  Probably want to also consider network speed? Or is that not relevant with tumbleweed installs?
                  better choice to download image, and install from usb key..... then having a issue with network

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Steffo View Post

                    Snapper is a big deal. Second, SUSE has Btrfs developers. This is the reason why it supports the filesystem and Red Hat not. Also Canonical doesn't support Btrfs it well.
                    Fedora adopted BTRFS as default recently. No idea if they've got Snapper setup by default too or how the other stuff compares.

                    OpenSUSE loses Snapper if you don't go with the default BTRFS setup iirc (as in, you still use BTRFS but change subvols and such). IIRC, setting up Snapper isn't too difficult, the integration with GRUB requires a patch, but some other distros have that. I'm more interested in the less obvious additions related to BTRFS.

                    I'm not saying it's not a great choice for default BTRFS setup though

                    Originally posted by marccollin View Post

                    better choice to download image, and install from usb key..... then having a issue with network
                    I hadn't looked at the rolling image for a while. I see they offer a 4GB+ tumbleweed image which I didn't expect. How often is that updated though? If it's not often, how much is the size of updates after (or prior to) an install?

                    Some USB media can be quite slow to install from though too, but that's more of an issue with old USB 2.0 sticks with really poor I/O performance (eg 1-2MB/sec).

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