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Fedora 33 Released With Workstation Using Btrfs By Default

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Ignacio Taranto View Post
    Does anyone know if they created a similar setup to openSUSE's?
    I mean, with subvolumes and snapshots...
    /home and / are separate subvolumes. Nothing else fancy in this release. The goal is for the transition to be smooth and invisible, with the potential for advanced features later.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Ignacio Taranto View Post

      Oh, not this again...

      Please learn how to use Btrfs before complaining, you can create sub-volumes for ignoring COW for certain directories.
      That's is what openSUSE has been doing for a long time.
      People shouldn't have to know how to "use a file system". A file system should just be this thing that sits there and just does what it suppose to and be invisible, users shouldn't have to know or care about it.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by madinside View Post

        Contrary to popular belief, most people don't use databases on their desktops. ;-)
        Actually there are plenty of developers who run a database on their desktops - stuff like this, full power, is one of the reasons for having a desktop rather than a throttling laptop.

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        • #34
          This is not about databases. Btrfs is just a better fit on modern systemd-based distributions.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by 144Hz View Post
            This is not about databases. Btrfs is just a better fit on modern systemd-based distributions.
            I've not had a problem with EXT4 so its not that big of a deal. Some people are making too much of a fuss about it lol. It has this it has that ooooh ahhhhh lol.

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            • #36
              They once more moved shutdown option to a different place. This move is actually dumb stupid.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post

                People shouldn't have to know how to "use a file system". A file system should just be this thing that sits there and just does what it suppose to and be invisible, users shouldn't have to know or care about it.
                And from where such naive ideology comes from? Maybe it should also decide what you'll be eating next day?

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by sheepdestroyer View Post

                  The website rpms for at least Atom, Chrome and Teamviewer (I dont know for the other as I don't use them) do install the official repos ;
                  How isn't that the best way to deal with this kind of softwares?
                  It's pretty good, admittedly. I didn't think of Flatpak as some have suggested, and that solves most of my issues (Authy is an app I needed to install snap just to get running, but it works decently). I guess I'm just so used to the AUR and the yay helper tool that being able to type, for example, yay -S terraform or yay -S etcher and knowing that it will be available is something I miss. Nearly everything I can even think of is in the AUR. Fedora is a REALLY solid system though with, IMO, very sensible defaults and good quality releases. I'm just spoiled by having literally everything in one repo that easily accessible.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Volta View Post

                    And from where such naive ideology comes from? Maybe it should also decide what you'll be eating next day?
                    Some people seem to make it sound like it should lol.

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                    • #40
                      dylanmtaylor It would be nice if everything was packaged in Fedora natively, but certain philosophical and legal choices prevent that from happening (if it's not OSS, it's not going to be in the distribution repositories: exception to binary blobs that are required for functionality). RPM Fusion is always a great add for a lot of open-source, free software, and non-free or patent-encumbered software. Unfortunately though, if an official RPM repo does exist from the upstream providers or a flatpak exists, it's much less likely someone will choose to maintain it as a repackaged RPM. And that doesn't touch on the legality of taking a software package and redistributing it (some vendors aren't appreciative of that). COPR is there as well as a supplement for more individualist packagers and testers.

                      The AUR and Debian package archive though, those are beasts on their own (at least in regards to quantity).

                      Cheers,
                      Mike
                      Last edited by mroche; 27 October 2020, 09:46 PM.

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