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Fedora 33 To Be Released Next Week

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  • Fedora 33 To Be Released Next Week

    Phoronix: Fedora 33 To Be Released Next Week

    Fedora 33 will manage to ship on-time per its back-up target date of next week Tuesday...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...a-33-Next-Week

  • #2
    Btrfs as the default is pretty cool for the future, but I imagine that most workstation/laptop users won't notice a difference (assuming they reinstall from scratch and use the default file system).

    For my many Fedora installs, I'm going to stick to EXT4 for a while. I'm very happy to see that EXT4 continues to get a lot of attention and bug fixes and performance improvements in Linux. It's old but reliable and does what I need it to do. Btrfs features look great but I don't really need them in my day to day work.

    Happy 33 upgrade to all Fedora users! Happy 20.10 upgrade to all Ubuntu users! Happy nothing-special-quotidian upgrade to all rolling release users!

    Michael, looking forward to your 33 review and hope you focus on some of the little details that tend to get lost.

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    • #3
      I still see no reason to use btrfs and will stick to ext4

      Performance? Well ext4 is better in nearly task
      Fragmentation? Ext4 wins by a big and performance noticeable margin (eg firefox sqlite db)
      Snapshots? Lvm
      Dedup? Lvm
      Raid? Lvm
      Bitrot detection? Lvm (no corrections though, but well i have backups)
      Compression? Btrfs is a winner. But i have enough space and my biggest files are not compressable anyway

      Did i miss something? Or is btrfs just a solution without a problem

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      • #4
        For me btrfs is just great. You want to create "mistake protection" (snapshot: ) of 500GB catalogue with photos before starting some risky operation? Copy-paste in Nautilus - done in seconds.

        Copy-On-Write is excellent idea

        With btrfs is much easier to "protect" system before updates - I had couple situations that after `dnf update` in Fedora - something stopped working (problem with hardware not supported in Linux - nVidia of course). With btrfs snapshot before update - "rollback" could be done almost immediately. If I'm not mistaken OpenSUSE is doing it already automaticly.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by flower View Post
          Did i miss something? Or is btrfs just a solution without a problem
          You missed something big as a COW my big cocked friend.. don't forget that not having an extra computational layer (LVM) wouldn't be too bad as well...
          Last edited by horizonbrave; 23 October 2020, 03:07 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by horizonbrave View Post

            You missed something as a COW my big cocked friend.. don't forget that not having an extra computational layer (LVM) wouldn't be too bad as well...
            extra computional layer are only bad for performance.

            As ext4 outperforms btrfs i dont see your point.

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            • #7
              Thanks Red Hat. The Desktop lives!!!1

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              • #8
                Originally posted by flower View Post

                extra computional layer are only bad for performance.

                As ext4 outperforms btrfs i dont see your point.
                It's a filesystem not sex with your girlfriend/boyfriend.. all this obsession for performance it's non-sense, unless we're talking about an abysmal difference!
                Whatever turns your libido man

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                • #9
                  Fedora is getting their releases out so frequently and on time now that it stopped being exciting to upgrade. I say that in the most positive way.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by flower View Post
                    I still see no reason to use btrfs and will stick to ext4

                    Performance? Well ext4 is better in nearly task
                    Fragmentation? Ext4 wins by a big and performance noticeable margin (eg firefox sqlite db)
                    Snapshots? Lvm
                    Dedup? Lvm
                    Raid? Lvm
                    Bitrot detection? Lvm (no corrections though, but well i have backups)
                    Compression? Btrfs is a winner. But i have enough space and my biggest files are not compressable anyway

                    Did i miss something? Or is btrfs just a solution without a problem
                    LVM tools are horrible compared to how easy it is to use BTRFS tools.

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