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openSUSE Leap 15.2 Hits RC Phase With GNOME 3.34 + KDE Plasma 5.18, Sway

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  • #41
    Originally posted by Leinad View Post
    Mesa 19.2.6 , almost a year old, probably broken import from SLE, because SLE has "only" half year old 19.3. RC phase, nobody notices.
    Glibc 2.26, 3 years old, some games does not run on it. At least kernel 5.3 contains critical backports, like wireguard, so it is fairly modern.

    It looks like Leap want to be conservative. But don't be fooled. A week ago a big major version update of freetype was pushed directly to "stable" Leap 15.1. So some of us have ugly fonts in some applications now.

    So new Leap comes with outdated packages, while breaking changes are pushed into stable version. I was big openSUSE fan with version Leap 42.2 and 42.3 . But Leap 15 is disappointment.
    This is only a service pack, it is not a new version of Leap. Only "light" updates are made, although in this case the updates are significant, the base remains unchanged, to ensure stability and continuity.
    This is what all very stable fix release distributions do, such as Debian etc.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      Oh and about his hype on the "SUSE Linux Enterprise - openSUSE merger":

      He is just too happy about it because SUSE Linux Enterprise uses the GNOME desktop by default (and is the only supported one), and if it were to happen, this could be in turn the death of KDE on openSUSE... and that would be a horrible thing for us...
      openSUSE and SUSE are and will remain two distinct things. SUSE needs to have a basic DE and officially support it and since it is very expensive to do so they have joined other distributions that use Gnome. Among other things, a horrible version of Gnome is officially supported, reminiscent of Gnome 2, but on the other hand for enterprise use a DE is rarely used, if not for having a fixed window.
      In any case Plasma is also available in SUSE.
      As I said ... SUSE and openSUSE will remain two separate things, what will change is that Leap and SLE will also share the binaries, thus having full compatibility.
      In my opinion many people here have never used an enterprise distribution, perhaps they would be disappointed if used in a home environment, many things that we use every day are not supported ...
      EDIT.
      Ops, mi sono reso conto di avere fatto doppi post, me ne scuso

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      • #43
        Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post

        This is only a service pack, it is not a new version of Leap. Only "light" updates are made, although in this case the updates are significant, the base remains unchanged, to ensure stability and continuity.
        This is what all very stable fix release distributions do, such as Debian etc.
        Debian has different release model, than SUSE. If you want know more about SLE releases, read: https://suse.com/c/how-suse-builds-i...bution-part-4/

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        • #44
          Originally posted by Leinad View Post

          Debian has different release model, than SUSE. If you want know more about SLE releases, read: https://suse.com/c/how-suse-builds-i...bution-part-4/
          Hi, I use openSUSE, not SUSE and my comparison was between openSUSE and Debian, not between SUSE and Debian, but you're right there are two different methods, but both point to stability as a priority.
          This is a service pack not a new version of Leap, so it is quite normal for many packages to be old.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post

            Hi, I use openSUSE, not SUSE and my comparison was between openSUSE and Debian, not between SUSE and Debian, but you're right there are two different methods, but both point to stability as a priority.
            This is a service pack not a new version of Leap, so it is quite normal for many packages to be old.
            openSUSE Leap contains almost full SUSE SLE inside. So linked article directly affects openSUSE Leap. My point was, that Debian has always very small updates in "stable". But in openSUSE Leap / SLE are some changes big in same version, while some changes are small even between versions. So I struggle with both drawbacks, not so stable and not new.

            I recommend you to read that article, it explains, that there are version with very small updates (*.1 and *.3) and version with bigger updates (*.2) . So it is very different to Debian or Ubuntu LTS release models.

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            • #46
              Originally posted by Leinad View Post

              openSUSE Leap contains almost full SUSE SLE inside. So linked article directly affects openSUSE Leap. My point was, that Debian has always very small updates in "stable". But in openSUSE Leap / SLE are some changes big in same version, while some changes are small even between versions. So I struggle with both drawbacks, not so stable and not new.

              I recommend you to read that article, it explains, that there are version with very small updates (*.1 and *.3) and version with bigger updates (*.2) . So it is very different to Debian or Ubuntu LTS release models.
              I can only tell you my experience, in my small company I have a 30 of computers. Until a few years ago we had Ubuntu, but we often had problems, so we evaluated various distributions, including Debian, but in the end we chose Leap and to date we have never had any problems.
              By the way, the choice of Leap was not made only for its extreme stability, but also because for us some tools like Yast and (auto-yast), are very useful for us.

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              • #47
                Looks like it will also support zstd: https://github.com/openSUSE/rpm-conf...ment-636781072

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