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FESCo Approves Fedora 33 Switching To Systemd-Resolved

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  • FESCo Approves Fedora 33 Switching To Systemd-Resolved

    Phoronix: FESCo Approves Fedora 33 Switching To Systemd-Resolved

    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) today approved the plans for Fedora 33 to enable systemd-resolved by default...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ll-Do-Resolved

  • #2
    I really thought Fedora enabled systemd-resolved long ago. I've been using it in Ubuntu for a while and it works nicely.

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    • #3
      finally the split dns stuff makes it to linux desktops. think macs macs had this for a while

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      • #4
        In before "systemd will eat your babies!!!111leventy-one"

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        • #5
          What is the exact benefit of this change?
          It is enabled via nsswitch.conf on my system, but since I replaced systemd-resolvd on my system with dnscrypt-proxy, the fallback to dns is used.
          Is there any benefit? (Probably performance if systemd-resolvd is used?)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mark625 View Post
            In before "systemd will eat your babies!!!111leventy-one"
            systemd-resolved uses Google DNS as a fallback.

            And what do Google do? They eat our souls!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

              systemd-resolved uses Google DNS as a fallback.
              is that hardcoded or can it be changed through config?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                is that hardcoded or can it be changed through config?
                Fallback DNS would typically be used only in the case of some other misconfiguration. Anyway, this is
                entirely configurable both by distributions and users

                https://git.archlinux.org/svntogit/p...es/systemd#n95
                https://www.freedesktop.org/software...lved.conf.html "FallbackDNS="

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CTTY View Post
                  What is the exact benefit of this change?
                  It is enabled via nsswitch.conf on my system, but since I replaced systemd-resolvd on my system with dnscrypt-proxy, the fallback to dns is used.
                  Is there any benefit? (Probably performance if systemd-resolvd is used?)
                  https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Changes/systemd-resolved

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CTTY View Post
                    What is the exact benefit of this change?
                    It is enabled via nsswitch.conf on my system, but since I replaced systemd-resolvd on my system with dnscrypt-proxy, the fallback to dns is used.
                    Is there any benefit? (Probably performance if systemd-resolvd is used?)
                    Compared to plain old resolv.conf there are considerable benefits:
                    1. it provides a local cache
                    2. it allows using more than two nameservers
                    3. it integrates nicely with systemd-networkd etc, so if you manage your network configuration using systemd's .network units, it basically "Just Works"
                    4. there is at long last a standard system API to control DNS settings
                    Other local DNS proxies (dnsmasq, dnscrypt-proxy etc) also provide points 1 and 2 (and potentially others as well) but points 3 and 4 still stand.

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