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Linux Mint 20 Doing Away With 32-Bit Support

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Aryma View Post
    i don't get why people use this instead of original ubuntu or even debian ?
    I installed Linux Mint two years ago for my grand mother. (who probably does not know that she is not using windows anymore).
    The familiar interface required little learning curve, she uses the internet, email, skype, word processing, printing, scanning, looking at photos etc. I get very few support requests now, and none of them are critical, everything just seems to work.

    That's not trivial... probably they are doing something right.
    Last edited by humbug; 04-01-2020, 08:52 AM.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by DanL View Post
      I see nothing about that on the official blog post. So that's pure speculation.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by NotMine999 View Post
        I run the few (3) desktops that I have on Debian Testing so I can do some of the stuff that the kewl kids do. And I don't mind spending a little bit of time fixing them when they get goofy due to a package update; what I learn on 1 I can apply to the other 2. After all, M$ Windoze has taught us that desktops are for fiddling after the updates are done.
        One of the reasons people are fleeing Windows is this bs of fiddling to fix things after updates
        I don't think most will like to use a Linux desktop OS that is kind of like that.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Weasel View Post
          I see nothing about that on the official blog post. So that's pure speculation.
          LMAO. Mint (not counting LMDE) is using the Ubuntu repos. That's not speculation. You're startling to sound like that 144Hz fellow who tells me the universe revolves around GNOME and anything else is "opinion".

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          • #25
            Originally posted by andyprough View Post
            When he stops maintaining his own DE, something that Canonical can no longer be bothered to do themselves?
            I'm curious if or when Cinnamon/Muffin will get Wayland support.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              One of the reasons people are fleeing Windows is this bs of fiddling to fix things after updates
              I don't think most will like to use a Linux desktop OS that is kind of like that.
              I agree. Most people hate to have to constantly fiddle with their desktop just to keep it working.

              I would add that some people want/need "cutting edge" features and thus require a "cutting edge" version of an OS to get support for those desired features. Expecting their OS choice to perform like a "stable" OS would is simply not rational.

              I seem to remember Windoze 10 implementing something like: (1) a cutting edge release (latest & greatest at the expense of stability); (2) a business-oriented release with less frequent updates (stability at the expense of eventually getting the latest & greatest feature in the future); and (3) something in-between (1) and (2) that compromised some "cutting edge" aspects for better stability. Choices, choices, but at least you got choices to consider.

              As for Debian, as you probably know, they have something like the release approach that Windoze 10 uses. On my systems that run Debian Testing I find them to be stable for their intended tasks (nothing truly "cutting edge" in my case). Past experience has shown me that Debian Testing has caused me to have to "fix it" perhaps once or twice between it's introduction as "testing" and it's "blessing" as "stable". Not a bad "fix it" rate; actually acceptable to me. If I don't want any "fix it" sessions then I opt for "stable" (stability at the expense of "cutting edge", aka choice 3 from above).

              IMHO software stability does not simply occur straight out of the compiler; programmers are not perfect, and bugs find creative ways to manifest themselves. Even Linus runs a Linux release through a few RC versions before blessing a release version. I used to write software for internal company use and I found it had always had a bug or 3 once I finished the coding, so I learned to test it 2 or 3 times and increasing larger user groups before calling it "production".

              Said another way with an old saying: "You pays your money and you takes your chance."

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