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Fedora's 32-bit ARM Xfce Image Demoted While Fedora Workstation AArch64 Gets Promoted

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  • #41
    On an off-note, just installed 32-Silverblue to bare metal. For some lulz, for reasons I had my 2nd monitor disabled on my primary Manjaro install. Completely forgot about that kept on WTFing when Firefox wouldn't open...and then I turned on my other monitor

    I liked that user wizard upon first boot. Real professional feeling.

    How do you Gnome people deal with no minimize buttons? I gotta get on with Kinoite

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    • #42
      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
      On an off-note, just installed 32-Silverblue to bare metal. For some lulz, for reasons I had my 2nd monitor disabled on my primary Manjaro install. Completely forgot about that kept on WTFing when Firefox wouldn't open...and then I turned on my other monitor

      I liked that user wizard upon first boot. Real professional feeling.

      How do you Gnome people deal with no minimize buttons? I gotta get on with Kinoite
      You can enable minimize buttons if you want, but really they don't serve much purpose in gnome and you can use workspaces and the activity overview instead.

      The user wizard is actually quite old and comes from gnome, Fedora is one of the only distros that opts to use it iirc because it doesn't force user creation in the installer.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        That's a load of crap and they fully know it, that's why they keep stuff separated like that. Debian does not care. Arch does not care. Their derivatives don't either.

        OpenWrt? Never cared, they had exfat kernel driver available since it was leaked in their official repositories, and so on.
        They're non commercial distros (try get commercial support for Fedora), but they're still legally liable to their respective companies and form the basis of commercial distros.

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        • #44
          Originally posted by Britoid View Post
          They're non commercial distros (try get commercial support for Fedora), but they're still legally liable to their respective companies and form the basis of commercial distros.
          FYI, by "commercial" I only meant they are literally or basically owned by, and therefore can and will cause legal liability problems for, an actual company. Free trials, demos, beta releases and PR material are still commercial stuff, even freeware is, if made by a company (as they are usually monetizing that in a different way).

          Both OpenSUSE Tumbleweed and Fedora are basically free beta testing for RHEL and SLES, while CentOS and OpenSUSE Leap are the "demo" or unsupported version that is otherwise equal to the commercial offering.
          Any bug you report is most likely going to be worked on by RedHat or SUSE employees (I actually know this for OpenSUSE at least as I did report something and they did eventually respond and fix it) and the very bug tracker is on the company's own infrastructure (or they pay for it). This isn't going to hold water in any claim of the distro being "community driven" they might want to make in court after they get sued.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by Britoid View Post

            You can enable minimize buttons if you want, but really they don't serve much purpose in gnome and you can use workspaces and the activity overview instead.

            The user wizard is actually quite old and comes from gnome, Fedora is one of the only distros that opts to use it iirc because it doesn't force user creation in the installer.
            The stuff on stuff look just bothers me when going from program to program. Like when Firefox is maximized and something else like the terminal or settings menu is over it, I'd rather just minimize Firefox first so the only thing I see is settings and my wallpaper or just settings. I'm also just not a big fan of those app switcher hot corners regardless of the desktop environment. I've tried and tried and tried to like and use them but they always end up pissing me off.

            I know that adds an extra step or two, but I don't mind. It's an aesthetics thing. I say all that and I don't mind drop-down terminals one bit.

            That Silverblue installer was pretty bare bones. I wasn't sure if that's just how Fedora is or if that's a Rawhide thing or a Silverblue thing or what. I will say that I did not like their disk selection screen. Two of my disks are identical outside of their serial numbers and if they're not mirrored I use one for a primary OS and one for bare metal testing. It's just a pain in the ass having to go to a terminal to make sure which is which because there isn't an easy graphical way to see partitions, existing file systems, etc w/o doing odd steps with their graphical partitioner (that detected my ZFS volumes as XFS...). Other than that little nitpick, it was pretty much "click, click, click, click, click. It's real easy, man".

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            • #46
              Originally posted by lowlands View Post

              Except for me as I do care for Fedora's ARMv7 flavor Last weekend I installed it on a Cubietruck and it's working great as a DNS, DHCP and TFTP server.

              Don't really understand the "downward spiral" thing. Preferences aside, Fedora 31 works well for my use case and I look forward Fedora 32 with kernel 5.{6,7}, Mesa 20, GNOME 3.36, LibreOffice 6.4 and all the other goodies it comes with
              dont get me wrong, i used to love Fedora but i get the feeling Developers just dont care for users. just look at Fedora's userbase, its slipping away just like Firefox's marketshare.

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              • #47
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                Any bug you report is most likely going to be worked on by RedHat or SUSE employees (I actually know this for OpenSUSE at least as I did report something and they did eventually respond and fix it) and the very bug tracker is on the company's own infrastructure (or they pay for it). This isn't going to hold water in any claim of the distro being "community driven" they might want to make in court after they get sued.
                This is also true for Fedora. The bug tracker is https://bugzilla.redhat.com/ i.e. clearly under Red Hat's domain and also the very same that RHEL uses.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by Tomin View Post

                  This is also true for Fedora. The bug tracker is https://bugzilla.redhat.com/ i.e. clearly under Red Hat's domain and also the very same that RHEL uses.
                  FWIW, on the Fedora site they have plenty of links the describe the RHEL/Fedora relationship.

                  RahulSundaram Went to go look for a line I read on the Fedora page yesterday related to what they're discussing and noticed that if one clicks one Spins, Labs, or Alt Downloads, on the bottom of the page on the footer are links to different projects under the Download category. The entry of Get Fedora Atomic doesn't go anywhere, 443 error, and should be removed and replaced with links to Fedora CoreOS or to Fedora Silverblue since, IIRC, those are what Atomic turned into.

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                  • #49
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    FYI, by "commercial" I only meant they are literally or basically owned by, and therefore can and will cause legal liability problems for, an actual company
                    Essentially distributions like Fedora are not quite like Debian in the sense that they are not all volunteer but they aren't commercial in the sense that there isn't direct profit motive like RHEL and direct volunteer contributions are welcome and encouraged. These distributions live in a in-between space. Now it is true that Fedora is a legal trademark of Red Hat but it is also true that volunteer contributors can and do drive the project in ways that Red Hat doesn't care about commercially. A couple of examples here would be delta rpms and delta metadata which aren't relevant for RHEL because there aren't any private mirrors and enterprise customers are not clamoring for it. A volunteer contributor drove both of these efforts and it is the default config in Fedora. Similarly you can consider stuff like Fedora Games spin or KDE spin etc to be almost entirely volunteer driven with support from Red Hat in the form of infrastructure or QA resources. Ideally these sort of relationships would end up symbiotic and commercial companies like Red Hat can continue to see the benefit of having community input early on in whatever they are investing in the free software space and drive interesting new tooling and approaches that purely volunteer distributions (which mostly focus on integrating what is already there) aren't looking at. Ex: Fedora Silverblue or Fedora CoreOS

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                    • #50
                      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                      FWIW, on the Fedora site they have plenty of links the describe the RHEL/Fedora relationship.

                      RahulSundaram Went to go look for a line I read on the Fedora page yesterday related to what they're discussing and noticed that if one clicks one Spins, Labs, or Alt Downloads, on the bottom of the page on the footer are links to different projects under the Download category. The entry of Get Fedora Atomic doesn't go anywhere, 443 error, and should be removed and replaced with links to Fedora CoreOS or to Fedora Silverblue since, IIRC, those are what Atomic turned into.
                      I would recommend just using https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Websites#Bugs and report it in the tracker or shoot an email over to the websites team

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