Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Likely To Ship With Linux 5.4 As Opposed To 5.5

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • royce
    replied
    Canonical's primary mission is now the server space. It's what pays their bills and their salaries. A choice like this basically alienates 1% of the user base with newer hardware, and for these you have two choices:It's not like your ass is hanging in the wind either way. Be proactive instead of expecting Canonical or any other company to solve your problems for you.
    Last edited by royce; 07 February 2020, 08:11 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Originally posted by Britoid View Post
    Using LTS distros on new hardware or on non-enterprise desktop machine has never made sense. It probably doesn't help that Ubuntu recommends users install the LTS version, where they then experience bugs that have most likely been fixed and the whole Linux desktop gets a bad name.

    Microsoft puts most users onto non-LTSC versions of Windows for a reason.
    True. I've seen a lot of people recommending old distro versions (Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, heck even 12.04 because it worked well on something some years ago), for new hardware, especially with AMD GPU and other hardware vendors who provide very late support.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Usual idiotic strategy of shipping with old software - on the other hand, AMDGPU in Linux 5.5 is pretty buggy for my R9 390. Here we go again, with broken support that won't be fixed for months.

    Leave a comment:


  • royce
    replied
    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    It is not like this will increase their workload by a lot, i mean most of the work they are doing between the 2 versions would be common, they would release the exact same LTS distro they are doing now but with a more recent kernel/mesa and other software. It is not a huge amount of work and people will get the benefit of both worlds.
    Feel free to do this yourself if you think "it's not a huge amount of work".

    Leave a comment:


  • tjaalton
    replied
    Originally posted by DanL View Post
    It'll be 5 years if you're willing to use 20.04 for that long. I wouldn't call that short. Anyway, I think Ubuntu and other LTS distros probably would have been able to patch Nvidia 390 to work with newer kernels as long as the changes between kernel versions weren't too radical.
    Don't forget xserver updates, which break the video ABI.. and this time there might not be a separate HWE stack (with renamed binaries) for 20.04, so unless the xserver is frozen by the user, nvidia-340 would get uninstalled on upgrade. But it's still undecided if there's still going to be a separate stack or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • TemplarGR
    replied
    Ubuntu users are often as much obnoxious as Windows users.... Instead of admitting that their distro of choice has faults, they always claim "there is a ppa for that". Yes, ignoring the fact that once you begin using ppas everywhere your installation ceases to be Ubuntu and becomes something else. Something with less testing and more breakage. But of course they don't really care, they can always reinstall (like windows users do every once in a while), right?

    If you have to use ppas, then what is the point of having an LTS in the first place? If your main software components are derived from an untested/not officially supported repository, you might as well use Debian Sid. The only thing you gain by Ubuntu is the easy graphical installation (a must have for those obnoxious windows-type people since they typically can't do anything in a terminal) and a nice default look and feel.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danny3
    replied
    Originally posted by sverris View Post

    You can always install the newest kernel from https://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/ if you so desire... (there even is a simple utility named 'ukuu' for this)
    Yes you can install the newest kernel, but you must expect stuff to break because of this.
    I have already 2 softwares that have problems with it.
    ROCm which is the worst, will actually refuse to install on Ubuntu LTS if you upgrade the kernel.
    Virtualbox will not start the virtual machine complaining about some kernel module they use.
    And these are only 2 that I need and found, I bet there are many more that have problems when you upgrade the kernel to something newer than what what they expect to be installed for that version.

    Leave a comment:


  • LoveRPi
    replied
    Canonical did the right thing although some features will arrive slightly later. Keeping with Linux upstream LTS means good security patches. Looks like they finally listened to Greg KH.

    Leave a comment:


  • Britoid
    replied
    Originally posted by Joe Braga View Post
    Why anybody utitilize Linux Distros Like OpenSuse Tumblemweed or Fedora that are rolling release/Bleeding Edge unlikely Debian Stable and Ubuntu LTS that these should be Fixed Release without packages freezing like OpenSuse Leap and CentOS
    I think because those distros have never spent much energy advertising or portraying to be a generic desktop OS, they haven't needed to because their commercial versions, SUSE and RHEL, are both already commercially successful where as Ubuntu hasn't been (Canonical has spent more years in the red than not).

    They're both brilliant distros and imho they do things a lot better than the Ubuntu, Debian etc (zypper/dnf throws apt out the water), it's a shame they're not suggested enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by sverris View Post
    You can always install the newest kernel from https://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/ if you so desire... (there even is a simple utility named 'ukuu' for this)
    I am aware of ~kernel-ppa though I've had repo syncing issues with it on ARM. I wasn't aware of ukuu. Thanks for the tip.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X