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Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Adds WireGuard Support

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  • Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Adds WireGuard Support

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Adds WireGuard Support

    While WireGuard was merged into Linux 5.6, the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS release is currently tracking Linux 5.4 and for the April release is likely to be shipping with Linux 5.5 as the 5.6 release will be cutting it too close. But Ubuntu 20.04's kernel has now back-ported WireGuard...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Adds-WireGuard

  • #2
    Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is going to restart YTLD!

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    • #3
      NetworkManager has WireGuard support, unfortunately it currently can be configured only via CLI, because network-manager-applet does not have WireGuard support added yet and most likely won't have it ready for the Ubuntu 20.04 release.

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      • #4
        Ubuntu team should try to squeeze 5.6 even though it's close or just delay the whole Ubuntu release to a month later.
        The whole release because it's that time of the year it's stupid, especially with LTS releases!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
          Ubuntu team should try to squeeze 5.6 even though it's close or just delay the whole Ubuntu release to a month later.
          The whole release because it's that time of the year it's stupid, especially with LTS releases!
          There will always be a big feature that is a month or two out. LTS focuses on reliable support with reliable timetables not last minute features. If the latest features are what you want then LTS isn't for you. Wireguard getting a backporting pass has more to do with it how long it has been stabilizing than how wizz-bang it'll be to have the absolute latest kernel features in LTS.
          Last edited by zamadatix; 01-30-2020, 05:43 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by zamadatix View Post

            There will always be a big feature that is a month or two out. LTS focuses on reliable support with reliable timetables not last minute features. If the latest features are what you want then LTS isn't for you.
            It isn't necessarily about the latest features, though. It's about using common sense to prevent bugs and provide a reliable system.

            Look at their KDE and QT version freezes over the years. They're atrocious and are likely the reason their users have issues with KDE, Plasma, or OT applications. Or LTS distributions not using LTS Plasma releases. It's like they went full retard and said, "Why would we want to provide an option to use an LTS desktop environment for an LTS desktop OS? We're just going freeze our stuff at random because reasons."

            Then there are kernel versions and what LTS ships with, not necessarily Ubuntu now, but just LTS distributions in general. Like when some feature froze on 4.13 and kept backporting a metric shit-ton from the 4.14 LTS kernel..I think that was Suse..but stuff like that makes no sense. You'd think that an LTS distribution would use an LTS kernel for stability and security (and features since GKH and Co backport new kernel features from time to time) over maintaining their own special kernels for 6 months to years at a time...because porting 4.14 into 4.13 or 4.12 for a year or two totally makes sense

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            • #7
              Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

              It isn't necessarily about the latest features, though. It's about using common sense to prevent bugs and provide a reliable system.

              Look at their KDE and QT version freezes over the years. They're atrocious and are likely the reason their users have issues with KDE, Plasma, or OT applications. Or LTS distributions not using LTS Plasma releases. It's like they went full retard and said, "Why would we want to provide an option to use an LTS desktop environment for an LTS desktop OS? We're just going freeze our stuff at random because reasons."

              Then there are kernel versions and what LTS ships with, not necessarily Ubuntu now, but just LTS distributions in general. Like when some feature froze on 4.13 and kept backporting a metric shit-ton from the 4.14 LTS kernel..I think that was Suse..but stuff like that makes no sense. You'd think that an LTS distribution would use an LTS kernel for stability and security (and features since GKH and Co backport new kernel features from time to time) over maintaining their own special kernels for 6 months to years at a time...because porting 4.14 into 4.13 or 4.12 for a year or two totally makes sense
              makes sense using a kernel who works with non free drivers when its come out, but in this case I agree or they use 5.4 lts or go with 5.6 even I can say 5.4 is buggy and crappy linux version and version 5.5 works much better

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
                Ubuntu team should try to squeeze 5.6 even though it's close or just delay the whole Ubuntu release to a month later.
                The whole release because it's that time of the year it's stupid, especially with LTS releases!
                I don't know, there's a warm feeling seeing how they were able to release on time every time for the past 10+ years.
                They've always has this issue with the kernel releasing too late before their own release, but let's be honest, if you're after the latest and greatest and using Ubuntu, it's hardly Canonical's fault.

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                • #9
                  20.04 will get kernel upgrades every six months (until 22.04 is available). Yes, they will be six months or more behind, but it's an LTS release, what else would you expect?

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                  • #10
                    You can jolly well build your own 5.6 kernel. That's the whole purpose of open-source; to let people muck and destroy their stuff in their own way.

                    When did Linux start catering to babies who don't even know how what a compiler is?

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