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Fedora QA No Longer Needs To Test Physical CD/DVD Media As Part Of Their Formal Release Process

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  • aht0
    replied
    Originally posted by onicsis View Post
    I read often DVDs. But never in the recent years used a optical media to boot, always copying or installing ISOs on USB sticks. Yes there is an exception qemu or other virtual machine. Works "out of the box" with any ISO image, any OS from DOS to the latest versions of Windows or Linux.
    On oddball machines, even modern ones, booting from USB stick sometimes doesn't work. Some distros would also occasionally f*** up and produce non-bootable usb.

    Been using bunch of DVD+RW's, when something would become obsolescent, I'd just re-write the media over with some other ISO. For large LTS stuff (windows, until now) DVD-DL works.

    Leave a comment:


  • AndyChow
    replied
    Originally posted by NotMine999 View Post

    With super small USB keys being more and more difficult to find every day, along with 16GB & 32GB keys being pretty common, I think we can expect Linux distributions to continue to grow into the available space.

    Geez ... I remember when all I needed was a single CD of CentOS (actually "White Box Linux", anyone know that one?) Disc 1 to install any server in my data center, and that was NOT a "network boot" CD image!
    I remember the first time Debian came out on two CDs. It was around 2000. I think you only actually needed the first to install, the second was extra packages. Around 2001-2002, RedHat had two CDs for install. You would put the first one in, it would load forever until it reached 51%, then you switched the CD and it would load the rest. All the time it would load, you would hear the CD-ROM's head trash around because it would scan packages but I guess they weren't in order(?).

    Leave a comment:


  • NotMine999
    replied
    Originally posted by AndyChow View Post

    I have some hardware which is x86-64 non-UEFI (legacy BIOS only), and it can only boot from DVD (or a PXE, but it's with a weird nVidia build ethernet controller. Yes, nVidia does make ethernet controllers called nForce and IME doesn't work well).

    I'm not sure I understand how it won't fit. The Fedora workstation install iso is 1.8G, the server install is 2.0G and the network boot one is 650M. The last one should fit on a CD, the previous will all fit on a single layer DVD. If there was a distro where the install media was larger, they could make disk1, disk2, etc. 'a la Debian. With blu-ray, I think you can have up to 4 layers, so a disk is 100G. With Debian, you only use the first disk anyway, unless you have a machine that does not have networking.

    I think every distro should at least have testing on an iso network boot image, but in the event that they don't, anyone could as last resort install a previous release and upgrade. This isn't BSD where upgrading from one release to another requires rebuilding the world from source code.
    With super small USB keys being more and more difficult to find every day, along with 16GB & 32GB keys being pretty common, I think we can expect Linux distributions to continue to grow into the available space.

    Geez ... I remember when all I needed was a single CD of CentOS (actually "White Box Linux", anyone know that one?) Disc 1 to install any server in my data center, and that was NOT a "network boot" CD image!

    Leave a comment:


  • NotMine999
    replied
    Originally posted by set135 View Post
    The idea here is that they use the same image[*] for burning to optical media and for usb booting. So in *theory* if it works for usb it should be fine for dvd. But because optical media is becoming antiquated, and resources are finite, they are not going to stop the world to test/fix a potential optical boot problem.
    * https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/11285.html
    Thank you for that link. It is well worth the time to read. It is easy enough to understand for anyone that knows the basics of booting a personal computer.

    Leave a comment:


  • sandy8925
    replied
    Originally posted by AndyChow View Post

    I have some hardware which is x86-64 non-UEFI (legacy BIOS only), and it can only boot from DVD (or a PXE, but it's with a weird nVidia build ethernet controller. Yes, nVidia does make ethernet controllers called nForce and IME doesn't work well).



    I'm not sure I understand how it won't fit. The Fedora workstation install iso is 1.8G, the server install is 2.0G and the network boot one is 650M. The last one should fit on a CD, the previous will all fit on a single layer DVD. If there was a distro where the install media was larger, they could make disk1, disk2, etc. 'a la Debian. With blu-ray, I think you can have up to 4 layers, so a disk is 100G. With Debian, you only use the first disk anyway, unless you have a machine that does not have networking.

    I think every distro should at least have testing on an iso network boot image, but in the event that they don't, anyone could as last resort install a previous release and upgrade. This isn't BSD where upgrading from one release to another requires rebuilding the world from source code.
    I have one such machine, but luckily it boots from USB.

    Leave a comment:


  • set135
    replied
    The idea here is that they use the same image[*] for burning to optical media and for usb booting. So in *theory* if it works for usb it should be fine for dvd. But because optical media is becoming antiquated, and resources are finite, they are not going to stop the world to test/fix a potential optical boot problem.
    * https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/11285.html

    Leave a comment:


  • AndyChow
    replied
    Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

    (*) Such as systems no longer being sold, and while if one looks at the entire Fedora community, there are certainly people running 10+ year old systems, they now have to pick up some of the testing rather than expecting the Fedora team to keep systems of that age running for testing. As I recall, one case which typically causes the most angst are old 32-bit only UEFI systems (on x86-64 hardware) that can only boot from DVD.
    I have some hardware which is x86-64 non-UEFI (legacy BIOS only), and it can only boot from DVD (or a PXE, but it's with a weird nVidia build ethernet controller. Yes, nVidia does make ethernet controllers called nForce and IME doesn't work well).

    Originally posted by caligula View Post
    Sticking with ISO seems rather silly considering that the image won't fit on CD/DVD (ok, maybe double layer DVD-R). The fact is, other boot media won't even require using ISO disk format. In fact they totally ignore all the ISO9660 structures in the image.
    I'm not sure I understand how it won't fit. The Fedora workstation install iso is 1.8G, the server install is 2.0G and the network boot one is 650M. The last one should fit on a CD, the previous will all fit on a single layer DVD. If there was a distro where the install media was larger, they could make disk1, disk2, etc. 'a la Debian. With blu-ray, I think you can have up to 4 layers, so a disk is 100G. With Debian, you only use the first disk anyway, unless you have a machine that does not have networking.

    I think every distro should at least have testing on an iso network boot image, but in the event that they don't, anyone could as last resort install a previous release and upgrade. This isn't BSD where upgrading from one release to another requires rebuilding the world from source code.

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Sticking with ISO seems rather silly considering that the image won't fit on CD/DVD (ok, maybe double layer DVD-R). The fact is, other boot media won't even require using ISO disk format. In fact they totally ignore all the ISO9660 structures in the image.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sluthy
    replied
    I often still burn CD/DVDs when installing or trying distros, mostly because I can never seem to get USBs to boot. Whether I use unetbootin or dd or whatever, it's very hit or miss whether it actually becomes bootable - assuming the PC I'm trying it in even supports USB boot, which is not a given even with semi-recent hardware. Optical media burned from an ISO, however, "Just Works"™.

    Leave a comment:


  • onicsis
    replied
    I read often DVDs. But never in the recent years used a optical media to boot, always copying or installing ISOs on USB sticks. Yes there is an exception qemu or other virtual machine. Works "out of the box" with any ISO image, any OS from DOS to the latest versions of Windows or Linux.

    Leave a comment:

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