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Fedora 32 Looking At Using EarlyOOM By Default To Better Deal With Low Memory Situations

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  • #21
    I got the solution !

    While (1) {
    killall -9 firefox
    killall -9 chrome
    killall -9 chromium
    sleep 600
    }

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Raka555 View Post
      I got the solution !

      While (1) {
      killall -9 firefox
      killall -9 chrome
      killall -9 chromium
      sleep 600
      }

      kill -9? Have mercy!

      killall appname; sleep 10; killall -9 appname # just in case

      Jokes aside this won't even work for its intended use case in many cases, e.g. have little RAM and open LOTS of pages fast/simultaneously.
      Last edited by birdie; 01-03-2020, 07:17 PM.

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      • #23
        Everyone seems so bent on one special solution. One solution isn't going to work everywhere, so let's instead identify where different systems, well, differ. Expose a few knobs, and let them be dialed in. Server/default? What we have now is probably pretty close. Desktop? The newest process probably has the least amount of valuable stuff going on. Mobile/embedded? Least recently used. Same thing with the scheduler. Stop trying to make CFS do everything. PDS works great for a few high priority tasks and reducing everything else (gaming), and real-time for desktop and embedded.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Snaipersky View Post
          Everyone seems so bent on one special solution. One solution isn't going to work everywhere, so let's instead identify where different systems, well, differ. Expose a few knobs, and let them be dialed in. Server/default? What we have now is probably pretty close. Desktop? The newest process probably has the least amount of valuable stuff going on. Mobile/embedded? Least recently used. Same thing with the scheduler. Stop trying to make CFS do everything. PDS works great for a few high priority tasks and reducing everything else (gaming), and real-time for desktop and embedded.
          That's weird. Windows and FreeBSD (and probably MacOS X as well) have been demonstrated to just work™ with a single solution which fits them all. NIH much?

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          • #25
            Originally posted by birdie View Post

            That's weird. Windows and FreeBSD (and probably MacOS X as well) have been demonstrated to just work™ with a single solution which fits them all. NIH much?
            https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/out-of-memory.69755/

            You look smarter when you post just one comment per page.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by Snaipersky View Post
              Everyone seems so bent on one special solution. One solution isn't going to work everywhere, so let's instead identify where different systems, well, differ. Expose a few knobs, and let them be dialed in. Server/default? What we have now is probably pretty close. Desktop? The newest process probably has the least amount of valuable stuff going on. Mobile/embedded? Least recently used. Same thing with the scheduler. Stop trying to make CFS do everything. PDS works great for a few high priority tasks and reducing everything else (gaming), and real-time for desktop and embedded.
              I think people are trying to solve the wrong problem here..

              The solution is the same one that has always existed. Have enough ram for your workload.

              The problem isn't that Linux can't deal with this situation preferably to everyones satisfaction as that situation doesn't exist. You have a subscription over resources available, something has to fail. The *real* problem and the one that needs to be addressed is not how Linux deals with that problem, it's why Linux hangs and gets into a unresponsive state when it is in that situation.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by Volta View Post

                https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/out-of-memory.69755/

                You look smarter when you post just one comment per page.
                Well, I believed the testimony of a person earlier in this discussion - don't blame me for that ;-) This still leaves us with Windows which is known to work in this case just fine. And among Linux and FreeBSD, Windows is the only OS which was primarily developed for the desktop.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by birdie View Post

                  Well, I believed the testimony of a person earlier in this discussion - don't blame me for that ;-) This still leaves us with Windows which is known to work in this case just fine. And among Linux and FreeBSD, Windows is the only OS which was primarily developed for the desktop.
                  I think you're justified. Don't take my previous comment too personal, please.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by birdie View Post

                    That's weird. Windows and FreeBSD (and probably MacOS X as well) have been demonstrated to just work™ with a single solution which fits them all. NIH much?
                    Ah yes, which is why windows server is the dominant high-performance server and embedded OS right? And FreeBSD code is /never/ touched by anyone for any deployment.
                    Right tool for the right job.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by birdie View Post

                      Well, I believed the testimony of a person earlier in this discussion - don't blame me for that ;-) This still leaves us with Windows which is known to work in this case just fine. And among Linux and FreeBSD, Windows is the only OS which was primarily developed for the desktop.
                      For at least Windows and macOS, they have a more tightly-coupled and desktop-focused userspace, and I believe they have made their respective kernels aware of which pages it can safely swap and not hurt responsiveness of the desktop. But with Linux it's a complete wild-west as to what could be running on top of it, so it can't reliably know what is important and what isn't quite as easily.

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