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Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS To Retire Their Old Debian Installer To Focus On Subiquity

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by timofonic View Post
    What advantages does it have over the new Debian installer?
    Nothing that couldn't be added to Debian's in far less effort I guess.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Arch has no installer

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by kobblestown View Post
    Can any other installer do that?
    OpenSUSE's automatically detects the use of serial and shows up there.

    Leave a comment:


  • royce
    replied
    Originally posted by chroma View Post
    Although I'm running 19.10 having upgraded from an installed 19.04, I was sort of puzzled when I installed it... "But... where's the software RAID option in this partition configurator?" No, I wasn't simply unobservant, a major Linux distro had shipped without support for installation on Linux software RAID. *bonks head against desk* What is this late trend to replace beloved well-established packages with buggy underdeveloped feature incompletely versions of themselves? In what world does this come off as anything other than kids who care more about their pet projects than delivering software that meets the needs and expectations of the community and builds upon the past rather than tears is down with no viable replacement.
    Because RAID is niche on desktop linux usage. At best. Subiquity does have support for it. You can install a desktop system with it just fine. Canonical do not have infinite resource for desktop anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • RussianNeuroMancer
    replied
    Will they retire mini.iso as well? Otherwise Debian installer will remain available.

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  • Sonadow
    replied
    At first glance, my brain processed the headline as Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS To Retire Their Old Debian Installer To Focus On Stupidity

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  • rhavenn
    replied
    Originally posted by NotMine999 View Post
    It has been years since I used Ubuntu, so whatever they do will not bother me.

    As for the Debian Installer interface, I have tried both the text and the GUI interfaces. I find the text interface "works faster" (subjective opinion) for my uses compared to the GUI. All I need is a keyboard and a monitor, and I have that on my "crash cart" all the time.

    Now if only Debian can craft an installer option that installs a totally lean, barebones, SSH only with network support "task" on bare metal. That would save me the hassle of going through what Debian installs for just an SSH+basic system utilities install and purging something like 500 MB or more of unwanted 'cruft'. Then I can script the stuff I normally install.

    Could I script a "purge" script to remove the 'cruft' that I know of? Yes, but Debian packages & updates seem to have a magnetic quality that attracts additional packages that have no reason to exist on the system, or worse, adding new unexpected dependencies. So even with a "purge" script I would still have to spend a few hours working over the install to clean out bits & pieces. Right now I factor the "clean up" phase into my system setup time.

    So what about making an image of a base install that I like? I have tried that, but then I have to account for differences in hardware. My environment has quite a mix of hardware; different sized SSDs, different types of motherboards, different types of network cards with some needing firmware (Realtek ... ew!). Having standardized hardware would be very nice, but it's not in the budget... so I am told.

    Using the Debian net-installer solves the hardware differences issue by downloading what the net-installer needs to complete the install, and those downloads are up-to-date packages, making the system "ready for customization" (apps, firmware, etc.) when I am done. I have yet to encounter any hardware that the net-installer cannot handle, but I do keep a current full DVD Debian image on a USB key handy.
    Run the "Expert" mode installer. There will be an option on the "Packages" page called "Basic Tools" or something. Uncheck that and just check OpenSSH and you'll have a really minimal system. That option is hidden with the default installer. If you set a custom ISO you can disable that checkbox behind the scenes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danielsan
    replied
    I found the Server version installer well done and straightforward to the scope, it makes sense!

    Leave a comment:


  • chroma
    replied
    Although I'm running 19.10 having upgraded from an installed 19.04, I was sort of puzzled when I installed it... "But... where's the software RAID option in this partition configurator?" No, I wasn't simply unobservant, a major Linux distro had shipped without support for installation on Linux software RAID. *bonks head against desk* What is this late trend to replace beloved well-established packages with buggy underdeveloped feature incompletely versions of themselves? In what world does this come off as anything other than kids who care more about their pet projects than delivering software that meets the needs and expectations of the community and builds upon the past rather than tears is down with no viable replacement.

    Leave a comment:


  • leech
    replied
    Originally posted by NotMine999 View Post
    It has been years since I used Ubuntu, so whatever they do will not bother me.

    As for the Debian Installer interface, I have tried both the text and the GUI interfaces. I find the text interface "works faster" (subjective opinion) for my uses compared to the GUI. All I need is a keyboard and a monitor, and I have that on my "crash cart" all the time.

    Now if only Debian can craft an installer option that installs a totally lean, barebones, SSH only with network support "task" on bare metal. That would save me the hassle of going through what Debian installs for just an SSH+basic system utilities install and purging something like 500 MB or more of unwanted 'cruft'. Then I can script the stuff I normally install.

    Could I script a "purge" script to remove the 'cruft' that I know of? Yes, but Debian packages & updates seem to have a magnetic quality that attracts additional packages that have no reason to exist on the system, or worse, adding new unexpected dependencies. So even with a "purge" script I would still have to spend a few hours working over the install to clean out bits & pieces. Right now I factor the "clean up" phase into my system setup time.

    So what about making an image of a base install that I like? I have tried that, but then I have to account for differences in hardware. My environment has quite a mix of hardware; different sized SSDs, different types of motherboards, different types of network cards with some needing firmware (Realtek ... ew!). Having standardized hardware would be very nice, but it's not in the budget... so I am told.

    Using the Debian net-installer solves the hardware differences issue by downloading what the net-installer needs to complete the install, and those downloads are up-to-date packages, making the system "ready for customization" (apps, firmware, etc.) when I am done. I have yet to encounter any hardware that the net-installer cannot handle, but I do keep a current full DVD Debian image on a USB key handy.
    Look into doing preseeds. You can customize the package list yourself, stick it on whatever you're using to image things, and it'll just go to town.

    Leave a comment:

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