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Some Of The Possible Changes Coming For The Desktop With Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

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  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by anarki2 View Post
    Did I happen to mention that the graphical installer still doesn't support dual boot encryption?
    What do you mean? Two Linux installs, or Linux/Windows mix, or something more esoteric? On one drive or two? I gave up trying to get Windows and Linux to coexist on the same drive back with SuSE 9.2... always gone with two seperate drives since then. Particularly with the advent of SecureBoot and UEFI, it means that the two OSes aren't fighting for the same EFI System partition.

    I've successfully installed Mint 19 into an encrypted LVM on one SSD (with Windows 10 Pro on another SSD), then got nVidia drivers working for CUDA, grub-updated to get Windows into the boot list then enabled Bitlocker via TPM in Windows 10. It works... or it did. That laptop did something weird a while ago and the TPM chip decided it wasn't happy with letting me into Windows via a PIN. Password was fine, but PIN? No, not having it.

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  • arQon
    replied
    Well, IDK what's going on with your system then, but you've obviously found something novel: Mez (see above) and I have both had no problems with dist-upgrades. On most of my machines snapd is purged outright, but I did have one where it was just disabled and updating that to 19.10 worked fine too. So I can't help (sorry) but it might be worth trying whichever of those you didn't do last time and seeing if that fixes it, as a stopgap.

    Leave a comment:


  • FPScholten
    replied
    Originally posted by arQon View Post

    This is simply not true.

    Hate on Ubuntu all you want - there are plenty of real reasons to :P - but false "information" like this doesn't help anybody.
    This has been reported (for the upgrade to 18.04 I believe) and had not been resolved at least for the upgrade to Eoan. I am using Ubuntu and reporting bugs for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • arQon
    replied
    Originally posted by FPScholten View Post
    If you remove or disable snap daemon for the desktop version of Ubuntu you cannot upgrade to a new version anymore, unless you enable snap again. The upgrade manager will fail without telling you why it cannot upgrade. (it calls snap to find out if there are snaps instaaled, but does not check first if snapd is installed or active)
    This is simply not true.

    Hate on Ubuntu all you want - there are plenty of real reasons to :P - but false "information" like this doesn't help anybody.

    Leave a comment:


  • Britoid
    replied
    Originally posted by anarki2 View Post
    I just don't understand why they feel the urge to always do things differently. There really isn't a market for that. We don't need another installer. How about fully embracing DI? Or Anaconda? I don't care, just pick one, the less you're involved in the development process the more stable it will be. Anything Canonical touches breaks, really.
    As someone who has to use Anaconda on a daily basis, I beg that no other distro adopts it until it's UX has been sorted out.

    Anaconda whilst powerful, has a terrible UI which makes the Arch install process seem easier. It's probably the worst thing about Fedora.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mez'
    replied
    Originally posted by FPScholten View Post

    If you remove or disable snap daemon for the desktop version of Ubuntu you cannot upgrade to a new version anymore, unless you enable snap again. The upgrade manager will fail without telling you why it cannot upgrade. (it calls snap to find out if there are snaps instaaled, but does not check first if snapd is installed or active)
    I don't know what you're babbling on about.
    I upgraded my laptop to Focal Fossa just about yesterday with a view to sticking to LTS (bored of upgrading a computer I use every 2-3 months), I don't have any snap crap installed and the upgrade worked seamlessly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tuxee
    replied
    Originally posted by FPScholten View Post

    If you remove or disable snap daemon for the desktop version of Ubuntu you cannot upgrade to a new version anymore, unless you enable snap again. The upgrade manager will fail without telling you why it cannot upgrade. (it calls snap to find out if there are snaps instaaled, but does not check first if snapd is installed or active)
    A bug report might be the way to go then.
    Talking about Chromium in specific: This has never been maintained by Canonical - you always got the version valid at release of the distro and you were always forced to resort to a PPA. Considering this aspect their snap approach makes probably more sense for the inexperienced user.

    Leave a comment:


  • FPScholten
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuxee View Post

    What do you mean by "mandatory"? Ubuntu 19.10 - which as usual provides Firefox as default browser - will install an optional Chromium as snap package. Nothing prevents you from compiling or installing a .deb-alternative (I would expect a PPA providing such an alternative).
    Apart from Chromium three or four Gnome utilities (font viewer, calculator, ...) are also installed as snaps but are equally available as normal packages in the default repo. (I've no idea about the intention behind this.)
    If you remove or disable snap daemon for the desktop version of Ubuntu you cannot upgrade to a new version anymore, unless you enable snap again. The upgrade manager will fail without telling you why it cannot upgrade. (it calls snap to find out if there are snaps instaaled, but does not check first if snapd is installed or active)

    Leave a comment:


  • anarki2
    replied
    Canonical tries to be another Red Hat, too bad they totally lack the vision and more importantly, the competence to do that. When you compare the Fedora experience to Ubuntu, it's just a different world.

    After reinventing the wheel so many times, and failing badly, with the likes of Bazaar, Upstart, Mir, Unity, Ubuntu Touch, Snap, MAAS, Netplan, I really don't understand how they still have the nerve to redo yet another component, let alone such a crucial one as the installer.

    The best part is that they already have Kickstart along with DI. It's broken, obviously, random options don't work or don't even exist in the Ubuntu implementation, but it is there.

    I tried this new hot garbage installer a few weeks ago, it errored out like 3 questions into the process, then I instantly went back to the "alternate installer" or whatever they call it.

    Did I happen to mention that the graphical installer still doesn't support dual boot encryption? Or that the ncurses installer won't allow you to delete the encrypted volume once you created it? If you need to make changes, you need to reboot and start over. How about fixing your current installers before rewriting it from scratch? What exactly are they trying to achieve with this rewrite in the first place anyway? I just don't understand. Neither do they, I think. It seems a classic example of NIH (not invented here) syndrome.

    I guess they want to differentiate from the others or something. But they are already fine. They have the PPA system which makes Ubuntu a really handy system. They have mainstream support, 3rd parties support Ubuntu first, and others second. They need to calm the [email protected] down with these idiotic additions.

    I just don't understand why they feel the urge to always do things differently. There really isn't a market for that. We don't need another installer. How about fully embracing DI? Or Anaconda? I don't care, just pick one, the less you're involved in the development process the more stable it will be. Anything Canonical touches breaks, really.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tuxee
    replied
    Originally posted by Hans Bull View Post
    I heard something about snap crap becoming mandatory for standard applications like chromium, is that still valid?
    What do you mean by "mandatory"? Ubuntu 19.10 - which as usual provides Firefox as default browser - will install an optional Chromium as snap package. Nothing prevents you from compiling or installing a .deb-alternative (I would expect a PPA providing such an alternative).
    Apart from Chromium three or four Gnome utilities (font viewer, calculator, ...) are also installed as snaps but are equally available as normal packages in the default repo. (I've no idea about the intention behind this.)

    Leave a comment:

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