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Canonical Formulates The 32-Bit Support Strategy For Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Syfer View Post
    Regardless, Valve are moving towards a 64-bit only world, with a recent beta having added a Flatpak style containerization option to run the 32-bit games in... or even all of them, for sandboxing purposes. https://steamcommunity.com/app/22141...5549018366706/
    That's what they should've done originally instead of throwing the toys out of the pram when Ubuntu decided it was time to retire 32bit libs. Flatpak and snap exist in part precisely to solve that problem.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by RussianNeuroMancer View Post
      Well, I guess as soon as Steam Linux Runtime leave beta this shouldn't be necessary?

      https://www.gamingonlinux.com/articl...ontainer.15384
      I don't use Steam (or anything DRMed) but some of my Win16 apps still require old 32-bit Wine versions because the bugs to restore compatibility broken by "remove the hack. Introduce initial version of proper implementation" are still sitting open.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by anarki2 View Post
        Steam not having a 64-bit Linux client is ridiculous.
        It's more or less 64bit already, it's a webapp and they don't ship 32bit webkit with it so you can't do much on a true 32bit system.

        Their choice is for games. Especially now with Proton (i.e. running Windows games with Wine) you can't drop 32bit without removing access to a huge list of games

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        • #14
          Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

          I don't use Steam (or anything DRMed) but some of my Win16 apps still require old 32-bit Wine versions because the bugs to restore compatibility broken by "remove the hack. Introduce initial version of proper implementation" are still sitting open.
          sometimes I wonder if Wine couldn't have been architectured around a different model (i.e. make a decent but somewhat generic core and have additional "plugins" that contain app-specific hacks and function overrides) instead than trying to focus on recreating a true single and always working Windows API (which is a dream even on Windows)

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          • #15
            Originally posted by jacob View Post
            Ubuntu supports Flatpak perfectly well.
            Every Linux desktop distro supports flatpak perfectly well. The point is that Canonical will never use it by default for a long while still as it is not their own puppy.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              Every Linux desktop distro supports flatpak perfectly well. The point is that Canonical will never use it by default for a long while still as it is not their own puppy.
              Canonical doesn't need to support anything. Canonical doesn't release or maintain Steam. Steam happens to be supported in Flatpak, which means that it's supported on Ubuntu, because Canonical does support flatpak. Therefore the issue of 32bit game compatibility is moot. Lots of people here seem to wish they could blame Canonical for something but there's really nothing wrong with their position.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post

                sometimes I wonder if Wine couldn't have been architectured around a different model (i.e. make a decent but somewhat generic core and have additional "plugins" that contain app-specific hacks and function overrides) instead than trying to focus on recreating a true single and always working Windows API (which is a dream even on Windows)
                Wine has a Windows Version dropdown that can be set on a per-EXE basis.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Syfer View Post
                  Regardless, Valve are moving towards a 64-bit only world, with a recent beta having added a Flatpak style containerization option to run the 32-bit games in... or even all of them, for sandboxing purposes. https://steamcommunity.com/app/22141...5549018366706/
                  Would sandboxing games via an unchangeable, yet open source steam runtime including proton, be an option to get Anticheat support?

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by jacob View Post
                    Steam has a Flatpak package that presumably bundles everything it needs in terms of 32bit libs. Isn't that a simpler approach rather than keeping a dead architecture in the distribution repos?
                    32-bit can live for long because the size of the 32-bit address space is sufficient enough for a large number of applications.

                    16-bit is no longer in use because it is mostly impossible to run any kind of a modern application in a 16-bit address space. (Most compiled programming languages do not natively support segmented/non-uniform memory in their type system.)

                    The missing 64-bit integer registers on x86-32 aren't a major issue because a major part of computations in most kinds of applications is capped by the size of the address space.

                    When x86 CPUs will implement memory renaming, the 8 extra x86-64 integer registers will have smaller performance advantage compared to x86-32.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by ssokolow View Post
                      Wine has a Windows Version dropdown that can be set on a per-EXE basis.
                      not what I mean, that is still a generic API.

                      I mean Wine being designed with a core functionality that expects to be customized and hacked to best support each application in a quick and simpler (and dirty) way than "the proper way" that will never happen as you pointed out.

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