Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Devuan 2.1 Released - Still Delivering Debian 9 Without Systemd

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by ALRBP View Post

    This proves you do not even want to discus, because such arguments have been told a lot of time, you just do not want to listen. I will still try with one anti-systemd argument : "systemd puts to many system components into a single program".
    ROFLMAO - that just shows you don't know what you are talking about with regards to systemd - please list all the system components in this "single program"

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by k1e0x View Post

      OMG you mean instead of stealing init scripts from Debian [..] The horror.. I wonder if they are up to the challenge.
      Not much of a FOSS fan are you?

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by ALRBP View Post
        This proves you do not even want to discus
        Of course I don't really want to "discuss", because I've been "discussing" systemd since the dawn of it and I've heard and countered every "argument" at least ten times over.

        Originally posted by ALRBP View Post
        I will still try with one anti-systemd argument : "systemd puts to many system components into a single program".
        Well, an argument without a proof is not an argument, so would you please name at least two?

        Originally posted by ALRBP View Post
        You do HAVE memcpy/strlen freedom. You can choose your C standard library implementation. (most people use Glibc but you can use musl for example if you prefer)
        In a distribution, you don't. You use the programs with the libc they have been built with. And then, sometimes you can't even build a program against another libc (that would be a logical equivalence of a program with a non-trivial dependency on any of the systemd facilities).

        Originally posted by ALRBP View Post
        Firefox depending on Gtk does not prevent you from using another GUI toolkit for other programs. Firefox works well with KDE, which is based on Qt.
        The world is harsh, and sometimes dependencies are exclusive. Go pester Docker about their "lock-in" to the Linux kernel via cgroups, and demand native Docker daemon be released for FreeBSD hosts. I'll wait here.
        Last edited by intelfx; 11-26-2019, 08:09 AM.

        Comment


        • #34
          There are some really angry systemd fanboys in this thread.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by rtfazeberdee View Post

            ROFLMAO - that just shows you don't know what you are talking about with regards to systemd - please list all the system components in this "single program"
            Beside its primary purpose of providing a Linux init system, the systemd suite can provide additional functionality, including the following components:
            • journald systemd-journald is a daemon responsible for event logging, with append-only binary files serving as its logfiles. The system administrator may choose whether to log system events with systemd-journald, syslog-ng or rsyslog. The potential for corruption of the binary format has led to much heated debate.[21]
            • logind systemd-logind is a daemon that manages user logins and seats in various ways. It is an integrated login manager that offers multiseat improvements[22] and replaces ConsoleKit, which is no longer maintained.[23] For X11 display managers the switch to logind requires a minimal amount of porting.[24] It was integrated in systemd version 30.
            • networkd networkd is a daemon to handle the configuration of the network interfaces; in version 209, when it was first integrated, support was limited to statically assigned addresses and basic support for bridging configuration.[25][26][27][28][29] In July 2014, systemd version 215 was released, adding new features such as a DHCP server for IPv4 hosts, and VXLAN support.[30][31]
            • tmpfiles systemd-tmpfiles is a utility that takes care of creation and clean-up of temporary files and directories. It is normally run once at startup and then in specified intervals.
            • timedated systemd-timedated is a daemon that can be used to control time-related settings, such as the system time, system time zone, or selection between UTC and local time-zone system clock. It is accessible through D-Bus.[32] It was integrated in systemd version 30.
            • udevd udev is a device manager for the Linux kernel, which handles the /dev directory and all user space actions when adding/removing devices, including firmware loading. In April 2012, the source tree for udev was merged into the systemd source tree.[33][34] On May 29, 2014, support for firmware loading through udev was dropped from systemd, as it was decided that the kernel should be responsible for loading firmware.[35] libudev It is the standard library for utilizing udev, which allows third-party applications to query udev resources.
            • systemd-boot systemd-boot is a boot manager, formerly known as gummiboot. Kay Sievers merged it into systemd with rev 220.

            Comment


            • #36
              You actually don't need devuan to run debian 9 without systemd as PID1...

              Code:
              apt-get install sysvinit-core systemd-shim
              and you are done
              Last edited by Bigon; 11-26-2019, 09:03 AM.

              Comment


              • #37
                I have been using Devuan (testing) for a while with Runit as init system and it worked quite well, and for a desktop use is good enough to handle basic system use, eventually would be useful an alternative init system compatible with systemd but with a smaller footprint and lesser features.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by ALRBP View Post

                  This proves you do not even want to discus, because such arguments have been told a lot of time, you just do not want to listen. I will still try with one anti-systemd argument : "systemd puts to many system components into a single program".


                  You do HAVE memcpy/strlen freedom. You can choose your C standard library implementation. (most people use Glibc but you can use musl for example if you prefer)


                  Firefox depending on Gtk does not prevent you from using another GUI toolkit for other programs. Firefox works well with KDE, which is based on Qt.
                  Also, a GUI toolkit is less low-level than systemd. I can easily uninstall any GTK app and still have a working Qt desktop. However, I can't just uninstall systemd if I wanted to.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by pal666 View Post
                    so how many init systems and kernels freebsd supports, clown?
                    Kernels? .. ? k

                    You're missing the point, clown. The point is the Linux community isn't what it was. If all the large corporations could even be counted as community members.. what's left after that? Religious Gnu\Trolls?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Raka555 View Post

                      Beside its primary purpose of providing a Linux init system, the systemd suite can provide additional functionality, including the following components:
                      • journald systemd-journald is a daemon responsible for event logging, with append-only binary files serving as its logfiles. The system administrator may choose whether to log system events with systemd-journald, syslog-ng or rsyslog. The potential for corruption of the binary format has led to much heated debate.[21]
                      • logind systemd-logind is a daemon that manages user logins and seats in various ways. It is an integrated login manager that offers multiseat improvements[22] and replaces ConsoleKit, which is no longer maintained.[23] For X11 display managers the switch to logind requires a minimal amount of porting.[24] It was integrated in systemd version 30.
                      • networkd networkd is a daemon to handle the configuration of the network interfaces; in version 209, when it was first integrated, support was limited to statically assigned addresses and basic support for bridging configuration.[25][26][27][28][29] In July 2014, systemd version 215 was released, adding new features such as a DHCP server for IPv4 hosts, and VXLAN support.[30][31]
                      • tmpfiles systemd-tmpfiles is a utility that takes care of creation and clean-up of temporary files and directories. It is normally run once at startup and then in specified intervals.
                      • timedated systemd-timedated is a daemon that can be used to control time-related settings, such as the system time, system time zone, or selection between UTC and local time-zone system clock. It is accessible through D-Bus.[32] It was integrated in systemd version 30.
                      • udevd udev is a device manager for the Linux kernel, which handles the /dev directory and all user space actions when adding/removing devices, including firmware loading. In April 2012, the source tree for udev was merged into the systemd source tree.[33][34] On May 29, 2014, support for firmware loading through udev was dropped from systemd, as it was decided that the kernel should be responsible for loading firmware.[35] libudev It is the standard library for utilizing udev, which allows third-party applications to query udev resources.
                      • systemd-boot systemd-boot is a boot manager, formerly known as gummiboot. Kay Sievers merged it into systemd with rev 220.
                      That’s not a “single program”.

                      Each of those bullet points is a separate program.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X