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webOS Open Source Edition 2.1 Released For Continuing The Palm/HP/LG Linux Distro

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  • webOS Open Source Edition 2.1 Released For Continuing The Palm/HP/LG Linux Distro

    Phoronix: webOS Open Source Edition 2.1 Released For Continuing The Palm/HP/LG Linux Distro

    Released at the end of October to little fanfare was webOS Open Source Edition 2.0, the open-source Linux OS currently in development by LG for use on their Smart TVs and other digital products. With webOS Open Source Edition 2.0, they began setting their sights on automobiles and other potential use-cases. That was then extended by this week's release of webOS OSE 2.1...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...E-2.1-Released

  • #2
    It took years to get Toyota to switch to 3rd party car console managers due to self described "security issues" mostly around timely disclosure.

    With more auto makers moving to virtual dashboards beyond just the center stack, this must be driving the market for more options currently.

    Magna International, a large global auto supplier recently spun off Magna Mobility just to focus on car interior integration.

    But the issue is going to be the same no matter what. All the automakers have developed a proprietary CAN BUS and so depending on the supplier, the bus is going to vary.

    Can someone just open source their automobile CAN BUS and then the aftermarket can take care of the rest? If a dash manager stinks, you can replace it in the aftermarket.

    As an example, all NATO certified aircraft have a pre-defined analog (older) or digital CAN architectures, why can't cars do that too?

    I can see your latest car meet in the parking lot now...."Wow, what a cool dash layout, how did you do that?......"I switched from Android Auto to WebOS and it lets me set up 20 variations of the speedo and tach!" "But how did you get drivers for WebOS to talk to the Honda CAN?" "Oh we sniffed it out using the OBD port and the JTAG on the ECM"

    The future of car modding is just around the corner.

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    • #3
      "This is the operating system formerly developed at Palm a decade ago already before being acquired by HP."

      No, it's not: the real webOS is LuneOS.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
        "This is the operating system formerly developed at Palm a decade ago already before being acquired by HP."

        No, it's not: the real webOS is LuneOS.
        That isn't true either.

        LuneOS is the open source successor for Palm/HP webOS where the user interface is rebuilt from scratch by using the latest technologies available (Qt 5.6.0 / QML, QtWebEngine, etc).[2] It is not intended to compete with iPhone or Android on features.[7] All devices can have a LuneOS port if they have a CyanogenMod ROM available that works.[8]

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        • #5
          I was a fan of Palm back in the day. I was sad when they closed their doors and I had high hopes for WebOS.

          When HP bought it, it seemed like that started off on a positive note by trying to develop a community around it but it seems they just dropped ball after ball up to and including the launch of the HP Touchpad.

          I had a Touchpad and I thought it was pretty cool. It was a bit on the thick side but it was quick and responsive and had wireless charging.
          IMO HP totally screwed up an opportunity to have a valid presence in the mobile / embedded market.

          Then again, in about this time frame, HP pretty much screwed up everything they touched.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cbdougla View Post
            Then again, in about this time frame, HP pretty much screwed up everything they touched.
            Did it change? I wasn't under the impression that HP is different now.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cbdougla View Post
              I was a fan of Palm back in the day. I was sad when they closed their doors and I had high hopes for WebOS.

              When HP bought it, it seemed like that started off on a positive note by trying to develop a community around it but it seems they just dropped ball after ball up to and including the launch of the HP Touchpad.

              I had a Touchpad and I thought it was pretty cool. It was a bit on the thick side but it was quick and responsive and had wireless charging.
              IMO HP totally screwed up an opportunity to have a valid presence in the mobile / embedded market.

              Then again, in about this time frame, HP pretty much screwed up everything they touched.
              I was hopeful for WebOS as well. Android and iOS have adopted some of the user experience bits from WebOS (cards being the most obvious).

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