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Red Hat Developers Eyeing CPU Thermal Management Improvements For Fedora 32

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  • Red Hat Developers Eyeing CPU Thermal Management Improvements For Fedora 32

    Phoronix: Red Hat Developers Eyeing CPU Thermal Management Improvements For Fedora 32

    Several Red Hat developers are looking at improving the CPU thermal management capabilities for Fedora Workstation 32 and in turn possibly helping Intel CPUs reach better performance...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...le-Thermal-Win

  • #2
    Fedora imho should ship with tuned too.

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    • #3
      It's generally been my experience that thermald doesn't work very well on my Dell and HP laptops - which ironically do have Intel processors - so I disable thermald on Ubuntu and replace it with TLP. If I don't the CPU clocks get locked at 800 MHz and will not change no matter what configuration I try. This is particularly bad on my new Dell which has an i5 8300H. At least with TLP I can get it to dynamically change clock speeds based on load up to a manually specified thermal limit. Thermald? Nada.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
        It's generally been my experience that thermald doesn't work very well on my Dell and HP laptops - which ironically do have Intel processors - so I disable thermald on Ubuntu and replace it with TLP. If I don't the CPU clocks get locked at 800 MHz and will not change no matter what configuration I try. This is particularly bad on my new Dell which has an i5 8300H. At least with TLP I can get it to dynamically change clock speeds based on load up to a manually specified thermal limit. Thermald? Nada.
        İt's easier than that:
        Just use the performance governor & disable any power-saving features (which kill latency more than anything)!

        The result:
        Your laptop gets the job done in the fastest way possible and then just puts the cores to sleep, which is the greatest power-saver of them all!

        (İf one looks at idle-stats with "cpupower monitor", one can see that all cores will be idle more than 99% of the time if there is no work to be done.)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

          İt's easier than that:
          Just use the performance governor & disable any power-saving features (which kill latency more than anything)!

          The result:
          Your laptop gets the job done in the fastest way possible and then just puts the cores to sleep, which is the greatest power-saver of them all!

          (İf one looks at idle-stats with "cpupower monitor", one can see that all cores will be idle more than 99% of the time if there is no work to be done.)
          Yeah I've seen that advice before, and it's a good way to burn up a laptop. It'll probably work on a desktop, but you're taking a serious chance with laptops which have tighter thermal constraints. The specific Dell I mentioned would definitely overheat if I didn't have active thermal throttling running on it. Or just lock itself to 800 MHz, which it's known to do - even with the performance instead of powersave governor set.
          Last edited by stormcrow; 10-15-2019, 08:41 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

            Yeah I've seen that advice before, and it's a good way to burn up a laptop. It'll probably work on a desktop, but you're taking a serious chance with laptops which have tighter thermal constraints. The specific Dell I mentioned would definitely overheat if I didn't have active thermal throttling running on it. Or just lock itself to 800 MHz, which it's known to do - even with the performance instead of powersave governor set.
            If optimising your laptop for latency already leads to it "burning up", then it simply means that it is VERY poorly designed & should be avoided (especially for more expensive brands like Dell & HP)!

            I have two notebooks where avoiding any power-saving features & using the performance governor hasn't led to any thermal problems whatsoever:

            - ACER Core i5 3rd Gen. (IvyBridge)
            - LENOVO Atom (Apollo Lake [Goldmont])

            On top of that, the Lenovo one is only passively cooled!

            Seriously, I don't see why Apple's macOS should be able to scroll a heavily loaded website smoothly while a standard Linux distro with a 'out-of-the-box' configuration keeps jerking around and making a poor impression!

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            • #7
              i hope intel-only stuff will not be run on amd systemd

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              • #8
                On my Dell laptop I stopped using thermald a couple of years ago. It was too confusing to configure and the only useful thing it ever did was set RAPL. So I wrote my own script to set the RAPL values to good limits and everything is fine now.

                For those who don't know RAPL is Running Average Power Limit and Intel CPUs will mostly obey it by adjusting iGPU and core clock boost. I don't think that it will reduce clocks below base but my laptop has never had a thermal problem running at base clock. Without RAPL set though it will run the chip temperature right up to 95C under boost.

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                • #9
                  intel CPU's, lol. Why would anyone buy one of those now in 2019??

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