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Clear Linux Offering Performance Advantages Even With Low-Power IoT/Edge Hardware

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  • #21
    Originally posted by arjan_intel View Post
    I can only speak for Clear Linux, I don't have enough visibility in "everything" the many software parts of Intel do.
    Clear Linux does not have any special Genuine Intel checks as you imply.
    I know the Linux kernel (upstream) has a few, mostly for cosmetics (printing model numbers etc) and for "on Intel cpus this is how you load microcode" kind of things and maybe some other upstream projects might as well, but we don't add any on top of this in the distro.
    We do use cpuid for things like "is avx2 supported, then use the avx2 version of this", which is vendor independent and is about supported instructions.
    Thank you for the info. Much appreciated.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by coder View Post
      After that shitstorm over Fedora maybe requiring AVX2, I've come around to the position that what we really need is a framework for natively optimizing software for the host. I wish Intel would invest their time and resources into a framework for doing that, rather than playing in their own little Intel-exclusive sandbox.

      However, I see the main benefit of what they're doing as being the patches and optimizations they're publishing to various upstream projects. So, the community certainly still benefits.

      BTW, I never used gentoo, but my sense is their idea isn't completely off. I'd make it a lot more automated and demand-driven, however - compiling & optimizing on-demand. Also, it could involve some amount of profile-driver re-optimization.
      You should try Gentoo Linux. It's all about optimising for your current hardware, if you want. Default is generic i686 or amd64, but can be set to GCCs 'native' CPU detection.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Spam View Post
        You should try Gentoo Linux. It's all about optimising for your current hardware, if you want. Default is generic i686 or amd64, but can be set to GCCs 'native' CPU detection.
        Thanks for the advice, but I'm more interested in seeing a paradigm shift than simply tweaking my personal environment. Besides, my existing setup is more than fast enough for most of what I'm doing, these days.

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