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Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Released - Switches To Using 19.04's Linux 5.0 HWE

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  • kneekoo
    replied
    As far as I know, the kernels coming through the update system are more conservative, avoiding big changes and possible regressions. The HWE kernels are newer and they pose incompatibility issues, which is why they have to be installed manually by the more knowledgeable people - who can handle getting out of the potential issues.

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  • elatllat
    replied
    Originally posted by kneekoo View Post
    ... people with different needs.
    Like what? (If both normal kernel package and HWE are "the newest kernel").

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  • kneekoo
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    Negating the point of the HWE package.

    It does matter for the above listed reasons, and likely more.
    The point of the HWE packages is to offer both the kernel and xorg, for those who need them. You might find it useless, but there are people with different needs.

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  • elatllat
    replied
    Originally posted by kneekoo View Post
    ...they choose the newest kernel...
    Negating the point of the HWE package.
    Originally posted by kneekoo View Post
    ...it doesn't matter the kernels themselves are LTS or not...
    It does matter for the above listed reasons, and likely more.

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  • kneekoo
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    Thanks, odd that 0 of the LTS from kernel.org are supported by Ubuntu.
    When the time comes for Ubuntu to release a new LTS, they choose the newest kernel that's stable and compatible enough for the LTS release. They do it because there's better hardware support in the newer kernels, compared to the LTS kernels. And by doing regular updates, the users automatically get newer kernels over time, so it doesn't matter the kernels themselves are LTS or not, because Ubuntu LTS will always have a supported kernel.

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  • dungeon
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    They support 4.4 with 16.04. It'll be supported for 4 years longer than the current 4.19 LTS release.
    Looking at the release and EOL dates of the other LTS kernels, 4.19 should be called a semi-LTS kernel.
    He, he, semi like if with semi-info 4.19 should be called Super-LTS as it seems will be supported for a lot lot more 4.4 and 4.19 kernels are currently marked as CIP kernels or SLTS kernels (Super LTS) in translation that means 10+ maybe up to 13 years of support

    https://wiki.linuxfoundation.org/civ...platform/start

    Drill is like "not every LTS is an SLTS", every about 4 years they marks one longterm (LTS) kernel as super longterm (SLTS) and continue maintaince. Plan is that they ending up maintaining max 4 SLTSes at any given point of that 10-13 years period of support, etc...
    Last edited by dungeon; 08-09-2019, 01:47 AM.

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  • Geopirate
    replied
    Does anyone know if this will break the Rx 5700/XT support?

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  • ari_linux
    replied
    Originally posted by calc View Post

    Ubuntu does 10 years like RHEL, but its free for the first 5 years and paid for the last 5 years. But yea I'm not sure why they both don't try to use a LTS kernel.
    Ubuntu use the latest kernel, closest to their "kernel freeze" development stage for the upcoming Ubuntu release.

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  • LoveRPi
    replied
    Get all kinds of issues with the Ubuntu kernels over the Debian LTS ones.

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  • Britoid
    replied
    It's worth noting Red Hat still support a 2.6.18 kernel if you pay them enough, which is 13 years old.
    Last edited by Britoid; 08-08-2019, 04:46 PM.

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