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Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Released - Switches To Using 19.04's Linux 5.0 HWE

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  • calc
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    Maybe I should have been more explicit;
    kernel.org LTS time = 5 years
    ubuntu LTS time = 5 years
    they should collaborate / synchronize to make it the same 5 years, so no version change would be necessary.
    The redhat LTS time = 10 years, but it could still share the first 5.
    and because other distributions like LineageOS, dd-wrt, etc also have old kernels like redhat they should use a common 10 year LTS on kernel.org.
    Ubuntu does 10 years like RHEL, but its free for the first 5 years and paid for the last 5 years. But yea I'm not sure why they both don't try to use a LTS kernel.

    LineageOS has to use whatever Android uses, due to binary blobs, so that would be on Google if they aren't using LTS kernels.

    dd-wrt, and other router os, probably have similar issues as Android due to blobs for the hardware in question. And they often run out of tree code due to being on non-widely used arches (mips, etc)
    Last edited by calc; 08 August 2019, 03:00 PM.

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  • elatllat
    replied
    Originally posted by calc View Post

    Try to update just the kernel to current release on a LTS 10 year old system and see what happens.

    Hint: It won't work.
    Maybe I should have been more explicit;
    kernel.org LTS time = 5 years
    ubuntu LTS time = 5 years
    they should collaborate / synchronize to make it the same 5 years, so no version change would be necessary.
    The redhat LTS time = 10 years, but it could still share the first 5.
    and because other distributions like LineageOS, dd-wrt, etc also have old kernels like redhat they should use a common 10 year LTS on kernel.org.



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  • calc
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    Sounds like inefficient proprietary behavior to me; They are all independently back porting the same ~4000 patches over 5-10 years to different versions.
    When instead they could just pull upstream to their out of tree patches (zfs/vdo/etc).
    Try to update just the kernel to current release on a LTS 10 year old system and see what happens.

    Hint: It won't work.

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  • elatllat
    replied
    Originally posted by calc View Post
    ...maintain their own kernels...
    Sounds like inefficient proprietary behavior to me; They are all independently back porting the same ~4000 patches over 5-10 years to different versions.
    When instead they could just pull upstream to their out of tree patches (zfs/vdo/etc).



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  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post

    Thanks, odd that 0 of the LTS from kernel.org are supported by Ubuntu.
    They support 4.4 with 16.04. It'll be supported for 4 years longer than the current 4.19 LTS release. Granted that those have passed their (Ubuntu's) extended support cutoff line (April '18) and are only receiving exploit fixes & critical updates anymore so that's kind of moot.

    Their 4.15 team must be porting a lot of stuff from 4.14 or 4.19 or something...makes no sense to use it otherwise.

    Looking at the release and EOL dates of the other LTS kernels, 4.19 should be called a semi-LTS kernel.

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  • calc
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    Thanks, odd that 0 of the LTS from kernel.org are supported by Ubuntu.
    Not particularly surprising since both Ubuntu and RHEL maintain their own kernels with many additional patches which aren't official Linux kernels.

    RHEL 6 - 2.6.32
    RHEL 7 - 3.10
    RHEL 8 - 4.18

    Ubuntu 14.04 - 3.13 (3.16 3.19 4.2)
    Ubuntu 16.04 - 4.4 (4.8 4.10 4.13)
    Ubuntu 18.04 - 4.15 (4.18 5.0)

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  • elatllat
    replied
    Thanks, odd that 0 of the LTS from kernel.org are supported by Ubuntu.

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  • aaditya
    replied
    Originally posted by oibaf View Post
    The wiki page says:

    Do someone mean what do they mean exaclty?
    It is referring to the CAKE algorithm.

    https://kernelnewbies.org/Linux_4.19...ment_algorithm

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  • Xicronic
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    I'm still seeing 4.15 on desktop and server, I guess one must explicitly ask apt for one of the 18 linux-image-5* options but which one?
    IIRC HWE is enabled by default on 18.04.1+ , but if you initially installed 18.04 you must opt-in.

    EDIT: See anarki2's link for how to enable it.

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  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by oibaf View Post
    The wiki page says:

    Do someone mean what do they mean exaclty?

    Leave a comment:

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