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Debian 10.1 Expected For Release In One Month

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  • Debian 10.1 Expected For Release In One Month

    Phoronix: Debian 10.1 Expected For Release In One Month

    Debian 10.1 along with Debian 9.10 are expected to be released on 7 September...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...arly-September

  • #2
    Moving past Debian 10.1, they will continue the trend of aiming for new point releases with the latest stable package updates roughly every two months.
    If that means that they'll become a sort-of a hybrid rolling-stable OS, that's really interesting. My number one complaint about Debian is that is starts to become old and stale after a few months and then you read an article from somewhere like Phoronix or OMGUbuntu about this new Mesa feature that'll fix some bug you might have.

    That's when you realize that it'll possibly be 6 months to a year before you'll actually get that bug fix whereas Tumbleweed or Arch is already using it in their testing repos and it'll be pushed to their stable repos in another week or two.

    If Debian isn't going to have that problem and become a better desktop OS...hmmm, you know, I'm really going to have to keep an eye on them this year and see what happens.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
      and then you read an article from somewhere like Phoronix or OMGUbuntu about this new Mesa feature that'll fix some bug you might have.
      Heh for me when I used to use Linux, it was the other way round. I used to run the old boring release of Debian and enjoyed reading articles about new bugs and regressions that would work their way into newer, more volatile distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora. Especially in Mesa or when their version was too new to support the proprietary blobs.

      Then when I realized that Debian was changing and the gap was getting closer between it and volatile distros, I then migrated away from Linux entirely.
      So I am not actually too disappointed by this change, it was all predicted and has been managed for my projects.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

        Heh for me when I used to use Linux, it was the other way round. I used to run the old boring release of Debian and enjoyed reading articles about new bugs and regressions that would work their way into newer, more volatile distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora. Especially in Mesa or when their version was too new to support the proprietary blobs.

        Then when I realized that Debian was changing and the gap was getting closer between it and volatile distros, I then migrated away from Linux entirely.
        So I am not actually too disappointed by this change, it was all predicted and has been managed for my projects.
        I've just been lucky with my hardware choices more than anything. Most of the time all I really need is the occasional office program and Open then Libre suites me just fine since I export everything to PDF; a media player and mplayer/mpv and SMPlayer usually just works; and since I mainly play slightly older single player games, Steam, Wine, and Proton covers my gaming needs perfectly. I'm cheap and pick up most games a year after release...I like paying 70-90% off.

        It really doesn't matter what distribution I use because I have simple desktop needs. I just prefer stuff that's newer because they usually play my games better.
        Last edited by skeevy420; 08-05-2019, 09:29 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

          If that means that they'll become a sort-of a hybrid rolling-stable OS, that's really interesting. My number one complaint about Debian is that is starts to become old and stale after a few months and then you read an article from somewhere like Phoronix or OMGUbuntu about this new Mesa feature that'll fix some bug you might have.

          That's when you realize that it'll possibly be 6 months to a year before you'll actually get that bug fix whereas Tumbleweed or Arch is already using it in their testing repos and it'll be pushed to their stable repos in another week or two.

          If Debian isn't going to have that problem and become a better desktop OS...hmmm, you know, I'm really going to have to keep an eye on them this year and see what happens.
          Definitely. I think for alot of people this has always been a reason not to use debian. GCC in debian can be over two years old, among a host of other software. This really hurt being able to run newer software/games, or compiling some software. Not to mention the performance and bug fix benefits some newer applications get, especially QT and Plasma ones.

          I really hope this is going to change with this new release system.

          Comment


          • #6
            Of what new release system you guys talking about

            There is no any change there, first point release of Debian 10 was just postponed by one month that is all ... as a consequence of these recent DebConfs being so far far away from homes of most developers

            For example DebConf 18 was near 10K km from London, while DebConf 2019 also near 10K km from London

            DebConf 20 will be nearer and finaly DebConf 21 the nearest

            After that maybe it would be time for Oceania, where Linux is least used
            Last edited by dungeon; 08-05-2019, 09:46 AM.

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            • #7
              Also second reason for this is that temperatures in Europe recently were reaching its highest overclock possible

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              • #8
                Debian point releases are and always will be just bug fixes, not feature updates. If you are a home desktop user and want the latest and greatest go for Debian testing or unstable. Or use buster backports if you just want some fresh packages here and there.

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                • #9
                  Still waiting for Debian testing / unstable to start rolling. Kernel and KDE Plasma are getting seriously outdated there.

                  https://tracker.debian.org/pkg/linux
                  https://tracker.debian.org/pkg/plasma-desktop

                  I build kernel from source to work around that stall.
                  Last edited by shmerl; 08-05-2019, 11:07 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                    If that means that they'll become a sort-of a hybrid rolling-stable OS, that's really interesting. My number one complaint about Debian is that is starts to become old and stale after a few months and then you read an article from somewhere like Phoronix or OMGUbuntu about this new Mesa feature that'll fix some bug you might have.

                    That's when you realize that it'll possibly be 6 months to a year before you'll actually get that bug fix whereas Tumbleweed or Arch is already using it in their testing repos and it'll be pushed to their stable repos in another week or two.

                    If Debian isn't going to have that problem and become a better desktop OS...hmmm, you know, I'm really going to have to keep an eye on them this year and see what happens.
                    Honestly,... Having latest fancy software mattered to me, only when I was an young boy toying with computer...

                    Currently, when I'm a grown up, even year old software is good enough for me, unless there are critical bugs (which get backported anyway), because I use a computer as a tool to get a job done. And, for few specialties of my expertise, I use an extra repository,...

                    Less updates, less maintenance burden, more time to do the real job.

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