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Ubuntu 19.10 Development Continues With Latest GNOME Updates, ZFS, Optimizations

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  • Ubuntu 19.10 Development Continues With Latest GNOME Updates, ZFS, Optimizations

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 19.10 Development Continues With Latest GNOME Updates, ZFS, Optimizations

    Two months from today marks the beta and kernel freezes for the Ubuntu 19.10 release while in less than one month is already the feature freeze. Canonical developers and others within the Ubuntu community remain quite busy this summer working on this "Eoan Ermine" release and is of particular importance with next cycle being the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS swing...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-July-Progress

  • Britoid
    replied
    Originally posted by timrichardson View Post
    The wayland blockers for Ubuntu's LTS are fundamental: for instance, they won't default to Wayland if a compositor crash kills the session (according to will Cooke). That's impossible to fix in gnome 3. So X will be around for a long time yet.
    Clearly RH and Debian both have faith in it, but then extensions tend to be the reason for crashing.

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  • timrichardson
    replied
    The wayland blockers for Ubuntu's LTS are fundamental: for instance, they won't default to Wayland if a compositor crash kills the session (according to will Cooke). That's impossible to fix in gnome 3. So X will be around for a long time yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • horizonbrave
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    it's winter here already
    same here

    Leave a comment:


  • nivedita
    replied
    The energy performance bias doesn’t force it into performance mode permanently. It tells the chip to more aggressively ramp up frequencies than a balanced profile.

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  • Chugworth
    replied
    Originally posted by nivedita View Post

    Does the energy performance bias knob help?
    Yes, the "performance" setting fixed the problem also. But I didn't want to run the laptop in performance mode all the time, and I didn't want to keep changing the setting back and fourth. So, just increasing the minimum percentage for powersave mode seemed to be my best option.

    Leave a comment:


  • down1
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
    In my opinion P-State is worse than CPUFreq:

    - It feels like a "CPUFreq Lite". You only have 2 governors: powersave and performance.
    - Powersave is misleading: it does not force the lowest clock but only leans towards it.
    - It is impossible to set a custom speed.
    - powersave is suppose to be the equivalent of 'ondemand' in cpufreq, but I haven't tried cpufreq so I can't say how that feels
    - it is very easy to set a custom min or max speed and toggle turbo boost on/off. You just need to pipe values into the correct place or install a gnome extension to do it for you.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by horizonbrave View Post
    winter is coming
    it's winter here already

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by down1 View Post
    Looking forward for the gnome performance improvements. I recently discovered why performance on my laptop was so depressing, turns out the intel p_state driver is very reluctant to go above 800mhz when on battery power.
    In my opinion P-State is worse than CPUFreq:

    - It feels like a "CPUFreq Lite". You only have 2 governors: powersave and performance.
    - Powersave is misleading: it does not force the lowest clock but only leans towards it.
    - It is impossible to set a custom speed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Azrael5
    replied
    Originally posted by cl333r View Post

    And all of this working with the Nvidia proprietary driver too.
    Exactly

    Leave a comment:

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