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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Enters Beta

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  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Enters Beta

    Phoronix: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Enters Beta

    Ahead of the first point release to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 due out around October, the first beta of RHEL 8.1 is now available for early evaluation...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Linux-8.1-Beta

  • #2
    Any idea when CentOS 8 will be released?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by brent View Post
      Any idea when CentOS 8 will be released?
      https://wiki.centos.org/About/Building_8

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      • #4
        Originally posted by brent View Post
        Any idea when CentOS 8 will be released?
        I would guess early to mid August. (this is just a guess)

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        • #5
          Looks like Zen 2 will come with 8.2+ (unless I’m getting my strings crossed). But that’s kind of expected since RH will likely wait for EPYC to be released first.

          I’ve been using 8.0 as a virtualized desktop and I have to say it’s really nice. Much more performance compared to 7, and the stream setup is fantastic. Although I am partially confused about their choice of keeping GCC as an SCL instead of converting it into a module stream, but it makes sense in other aspects.

          Looking forward to when EPEL and RPMFusion will be available, but until then I can build/rebuild my own RPMs.

          Cheers,
          Mike

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          • #6
            Its interesting, how fast RHEL 8.1 is coming along. Maybe some things just didn't go as planned with version 8.0?

            I'm patiently waiting for CentOS 8. I wish they take their time with quality control and release a stable system. I prefer to wait several more months and get another great CentOS than to get something now but have to fix endless amounts of packages over and over again.

            I use CentOS extensively on several major projects, including travel OTA systems, workflow CMS for HR businesses and various other things, like an e-shop that handles Bitcoin payments. I am waiting for CentOS 8, so I can migrate everything to TLS 1.3.

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            • #7
              I think the .1 release of any major RHEL version is quick, around 6 months after general availability of the .0. AFAIK further minor releases are not so fast, having a release cadence of between 12 and 18 months.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bash2bash View Post
                Its interesting, how fast RHEL 8.1 is coming along. Maybe some things just didn't go as planned with version 8.0?

                Red Hat is aiming for a 6 month minor version release cadence during the full support phase[0] of the product's life-cycle. It's a new scheduling system, likely to help align themselves with the OpenShift and CoreOS release schedules for cloud providers.

                Cheers,
                Mike

                [0] https://access.redhat.com/support/po...upport_2_Phase
                Last edited by mroche; 07-24-2019, 02:33 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bash2bash View Post
                  Its interesting, how fast RHEL 8.1 is coming along. Maybe some things just didn't go as planned with version 8.0?

                  I'm patiently waiting for CentOS 8. I wish they take their time with quality control and release a stable system. I prefer to wait several more months and get another great CentOS than to get something now but have to fix endless amounts of packages over and over again.

                  I use CentOS extensively on several major projects, including travel OTA systems, workflow CMS for HR businesses and various other things, like an e-shop that handles Bitcoin payments. I am waiting for CentOS 8, so I can migrate everything to TLS 1.3.
                  Instead of waiting, you could advise your clients to contribute to free and open source software by purchasing RHEL, so that Linux and other open source engineers can get paid to do their work. Or you could encourage them to continue not contributing to free and open source software by having them use CentOS, which does not pay anyone.

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                  • #10
                    well said and fair.

                    I do what I can and a few of them have indeed paid RHEL subscriptions. Unfortunately reality settles and most people are not willing to pay. I try to balance the scales in a different way, by contributing patches/code, by giving my support to others and by promoting CentOS to kids/students.


                    Originally posted by kgonzales View Post

                    Instead of waiting, you could advise your clients to contribute to free and open source software by purchasing RHEL, so that Linux and other open source engineers can get paid to do their work. Or you could encourage them to continue not contributing to free and open source software by having them use CentOS, which does not pay anyone.

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