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KaOS 2019.07 Released For Delivering The Latest KDE Desktop Linux Experience

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  • KaOS 2019.07 Released For Delivering The Latest KDE Desktop Linux Experience

    Phoronix: KaOS 2019.07 Released For Delivering The Latest KDE Desktop Linux Experience

    The KaOS Linux distribution remains one of the best options for those wanting to check out a polished and bleeding-edge KDE desktop experience. Out today is KaOS 2019.07 as the newest stable ISO succeeding their earlier 2019.04 build...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...19.07-Released

  • #2
    From their website:
    "Why are 32 bit applications missing?"
    I'm sorry, but I can't use any distro that is not capable to run any 32 bit program or game.
    I have some 32 bit non-Steam games that I like to play and a distro that is not able to provide support for that, is useless to me.
    Removing basic functionality and imparing a distro for the sake of a few saved MB with todays storage space makes no sense to me.
    I was impressed at first because of the latest KDE software, but no 32 bit is no game for me, so no thanks!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
      From their website:
      "Why are 32 bit applications missing?"
      I'm sorry, but I can't use any distro that is not capable to run any 32 bit program or game.
      I have some 32 bit non-Steam games that I like to play and a distro that is not able to provide support for that, is useless to me.
      Removing basic functionality and imparing a distro for the sake of a few saved MB with todays storage space makes no sense to me.
      I was impressed at first because of the latest KDE software, but no 32 bit is no game for me, so no thanks!
      I guess you showed them.

      Dropping 32bit support is not about saving a few MB, but about lightening the burden of testing everything just to offer support to a part of the less then 1% of PCs that run Linux on their desktops. Because, you know, even if you get your distro for free, it still costs money to make. It's also about minimizing attack vectors on servers, but that's not the case here.

      Also, as one that can't get to grips with Gnome, I heartily recommend Arch for the best KDE experience. OpenSuse Tumbleweed is also nice, but I think you need to disable some debug stuff in that one, otherwise overall performance will suffer. Neon and Kubuntu are also options if you don't need recent packages or are willing to live with lots of PPAs.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bug77 View Post

        I guess you showed them.

        Dropping 32bit support is not about saving a few MB, but about lightening the burden of testing everything just to offer support to a part of the less then 1% of PCs that run Linux on their desktops. Because, you know, even if you get your distro for free, it still costs money to make. It's also about minimizing attack vectors on servers, but that's not the case here.

        Also, as one that can't get to grips with Gnome, I heartily recommend Arch for the best KDE experience. OpenSuse Tumbleweed is also nice, but I think you need to disable some debug stuff in that one, otherwise overall performance will suffer. Neon and Kubuntu are also options if you don't need recent packages or are willing to live with lots of PPAs.
        If money is the problem for this, they should just ask.
        I would rather pay money for a full Linux distro than to get an impaired one for free where I cannot run my favorite 32 bit programs and games.

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