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Looking Ahead To Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 News During Red Hat Summit 2019 Week

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  • Looking Ahead To Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 News During Red Hat Summit 2019 Week

    Phoronix: Looking Ahead To Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 News During Red Hat Summit 2019 Week

    Kicking off Tuesday in Boston is Red Hat Summit 2019 where Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 could be released or at least hearing more about the company's plans for releasing this next major installment of RHEL...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...it-2019-Expect

  • #2
    Canonical also see a need for enterprise level desktop. Good times.

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    • #3
      Fedora 28 is terribly outdated at this point. I do understand that this is RHEnterpriseLinux but they could have based RHEL off newer Fedora releases. It's not like they had to test the entire Fedora package base - RHEL contains less than 20% of Fedora packages (I won't be surprised if this number is close to 10%).
      Last edited by birdie; 05-06-2019, 06:12 AM. Reason: spelling

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      • #4
        In the 8.0 Beta release notes, it is said that GCC is no longer compiled with Ada (GNAT), GCC Go, and Objective C/C++ languages support.
        What is the exact motivation behind this? (I don't have access to RH's bugzilla so I can't read the associated entries)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by birdie View Post
          Fedora 28 is terribly outdated at this point. I do understand that this is RHEnterpriseLinux but they could have based RHEL off newer Fedora releases.
          The lengthy test period for major RHEL releases coupled with Fedora's 6-month release cycle means RHEL will be two or more Gnome versions behind Fedora at release.

          Access to current Fedora packages is not why people use RHEL.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by buzzrobot View Post
            Access to current Fedora packages is not why people use RHEL.
            And to address this exact issue in RHEL 8 Red Hat introduced Application Streams - essentially rebranded Fedora Modules. That will allow installing newer runtime envs/apps without compromising guaranties of the base release. The only thing that I personally would like to see in RHEL 8 is extra repo with newer kernel and systemd.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by totoz View Post
              In the 8.0 Beta release notes, it is said that GCC is no longer compiled with Ada (GNAT), GCC Go, and Objective C/C++ languages support.
              What is the exact motivation behind this? (I don't have access to RH's bugzilla so I can't read the associated entries)
              Dead languages possibly. Lets face it Objective C simply never took off outside of Next, GO likewise is searching for a reason to exist. As for ADA those that need it are likely going a different route. So Redhat gets rid of three platforms that are basically useless and frees up personnel for other ventures. By the way useless in the context of RedHats customer base.

              By the way I really would love to see this freed up talent, redirected to support a modern language or two - like Swift. Frankly I'd like to see the move to a modern language, giving C a boot, due to the rather huge success Apple has had with the move to Swift.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by buzzrobot View Post

                The lengthy test period for major RHEL releases coupled with Fedora's 6-month release cycle means RHEL will be two or more Gnome versions behind Fedora at release.

                Access to current Fedora packages is not why people use RHEL.
                While this is all true the flip side is that many skip RHEL due to it being so far behind.

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                • #9
                  Wayland by default is perhaps the wrong choice with GNOME 3.28. It's definitely matured into a decent experience with 3.32 but everything previous doesn't hold up to an enterprise level experience.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by scottishduck View Post
                    Wayland by default is perhaps the wrong choice with GNOME 3.28. It's definitely matured into a decent experience with 3.32 but everything previous doesn't hold up to an enterprise level experience.
                    As always when it comes to Red Hat version number is more of a suggestion then the real information. Red Hat backports a lot of stuff to their versions of the software, so I wouldn't be surprised if GNOME in RHEL 8, in reality, resembles more 3.30 and soon 3.32 then 3.28 in terms of performance patches.

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