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Ubuntu 19.10 To Be The Eoan ________

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    It's written in the article
    ah, i see thanks

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    • #22
      Originally posted by kobblestown View Post
      I'd love it if they could just give up on this stupidity and call them by their numerical designater - 1804, 1810, 1904. Whenever I have to install some older version I have to consult Google to find what stupid name did that go by.
      Indeed. When you consult their documentation, often they refer to those names and that is not what you find on the packages available to install, like kernel packages. It can be infuriating if you are already under pressure to solve problems.

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      • #23
        Eoan Eagle.

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        • #24
          Eoan Erythrocyte. Mark can harldy get about with anything sillier.

          BTW, I'd support a petition to call 20.04 "Fscking Frog".
          Last edited by lucrus; 04-19-2019, 11:39 AM.

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          • #25
            FWIW,...

            Ermine

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Djhg2000 View Post
              Silly humor is what appeals to Linux users, or rather
              I wouldn't consider this to be "silly", as it's almost condescending, and recursive acronyms are the peak of good naming conventions. Naming versions like something out of a book intended for children isn't clever nor funny.

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              • #27
                Eoan RapeGoat it is!

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
                  Am I the only person who dislikes these silly names? They add nothing of value, and numbers by themselves mean more. On top of that, the fact that both words start with the same letter makes them sound like something taken straight from a children's book (maybe it implies the mental capacity of targeted user base).
                  Numbers are used when the product is released and reflects the time of release, so that 19.04 means it was released in April 2019. The Dapper Drake release was supposed to be 6.04LTS, but wasn't released until June 2006 and hence became the 6.06LTS. The version identifier is part of the URI you use to download packages, so it should never change, regardless of when the software is actually released. That's why names are used and why they're in alphabetical order. Using weird names makes it easier to use Google to find relevant information.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by jo-erlend View Post
                    Using weird names makes it easier to use Google to find relevant information.
                    I've never had issues with searching by version numbers, this would matter if Ubuntu was a bad name for SEO.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post

                      I've never had issues with searching by version numbers, this would matter if Ubuntu was a bad name for SEO.
                      You misunderstood. As I said, there is a separate reason for using code names, which is that the version number is not available until the product has been released. You have code names in order to have a static identifier throughout the development and support lifetime of the product. The code names should be in alphabetical order to make them easily sorted.

                      Once you do have a code name, making that code name unique is useful. Making it easily remembered is also useful, making the use of rare animals useful. I'm not saying the Adjective Animal scheme is extremely important, but only that it is, in fact, useful in addition to being a fun thing to talk about.

                      It's very easy for me to remember that Hardy Heron was the second LTS release of Ubuntu and that it was the first version of Ubuntu to include PulseAudio. Or that the Jaunty Jackalope was the first version of Ubuntu Desktop to run on ARM. But it isn't immediately apparent that Ubuntu #11, was Ubuntu 10.10, for instance, but it was obviously the Maverick Meerkat, considering 10.04LTS was the Lucid Lynx.

                      It's easier to remember why words are used than arbitrary numbers.

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