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Xubuntu Will Stop Producing 32-bit ISOs Beginning With Xubuntu 19.04

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  • Weasel
    replied
    Originally posted by mulenmar View Post
    Windows XP was never good
    It's still perfectly functional in many areas to this day, almost 20 years later. Compare with Linux 20 years ago which was a pathetic joke (and when I say Linux 20 years ago, I literally mean using a distro from 2000 today and see how functional it is). Heck Ubuntu wasn't even around in the 2000s!

    Originally posted by mulenmar View Post
    And could successfully setup.exe itself without the 30% chance of corrupting the new installation in the process.
    Never had any corruption, not on real machines, or on VMs. It's just you.

    Originally posted by mulenmar View Post
    As for being an unchanging platform to target
    That's not what I said but ok.

    Originally posted by mulenmar View Post
    I distinctly remember installing SP2 and SP3, plus about ten thousand patches, DirectX 9.0c, and a half-dozen versions of Visual C++ Runtime. I felt right at home when I learned how to use update PPAs on Ubuntu 8.04.
    Guess what? At least you could install that stuff 10 years later on it and have it work. You can't even install new packages in 5 years in Linux land (LTS distro) and most times even less time than that.

    But sure Microsoft are the kings of planned obsolescence that they supply updates and ability to install new apps on a 14 year old OS when Linux distros barely bother with 5 years (except security updates).
    Last edited by Weasel; 04 December 2018, 12:29 PM.

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  • mulenmar
    replied
    Originally posted by Weasel View Post
    WTF are you talking about? Windows XP was good for more than a decade. No Linux distro comes close to that, and if they do, they're way more crippled as time goes on.

    I think you wanted to say "Apple" there.
    Windows XP was never good, it was just capable of cleaning up when it soiled itself. And could successfully setup.exe itself without the 30% chance of corrupting the new installation in the process.

    As for being an unchanging platform to target, I distinctly remember installing SP2 and SP3, plus about ten thousand patches, DirectX 9.0c, and a half-dozen versions of Visual C++ Runtime. I felt right at home when I learned how to use update PPAs on Ubuntu 8.04.

    Maybe you meant FreeBSD? :P
    Last edited by mulenmar; 03 December 2018, 08:24 PM.

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  • Weasel
    replied
    Originally posted by garegin View Post
    I love how MS is the boogeyman of planned obsolescence, but they still release 32 bit windows 10.
    WTF are you talking about? Windows XP was good for more than a decade. No Linux distro comes close to that, and if they do, they're way more crippled as time goes on.

    I think you wanted to say "Apple" there.

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  • dungeon
    replied
    Originally posted by Delgarde View Post

    Presumably because a linear scale would be useless on a chart where the highest numbers peak at around 250,000, but where a lot of the interesting details are under 100.
    0.74% of else 64bit x86 submissions are 85.57% and 32bit are 13.69%. But it is probably true about chart, so that these downthere does not look like non-existent.

    On a package level spikes for 32bit goes from as low as 7% and as high as 16%... so for sure there are still a lot of 32bit OS users in Debian, something between 11.5% and that 13.69% on average and that is quite a lot still Interestingly, that even kind of stablise itself as other distros started demoting/dropping 32bit, so likely there are switcherers
    Last edited by dungeon; 03 December 2018, 09:36 AM.

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  • MVinhas
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

    And because it's debianxfce-approved.
    debianxfce approves Debian stable with buggy software? Yeah right.

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  • Delgarde
    replied
    Originally posted by llukas View Post

    Why log scale on Y axis?
    Presumably because a linear scale would be useless on a chart where the highest numbers peak at around 250,000, but where a lot of the interesting details are under 100.

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  • Anvil
    replied
    Originally posted by cRaZy-bisCuiT View Post
    It's about time.
    it is, it also cuts down the cost of making 32bit images, im assuming Fedora will do the same

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  • dungeon
    replied
    Originally posted by llukas View Post

    Why log scale on Y axis?
    No, idea - maybe it is some standard i am not aware of Maybe so that it works on some text based web browsers and that imagemagick could show it or something

    Leave a comment:


  • Azrael5
    replied
    32 bit systems will be deprecated within 2 years.

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  • Azrael5
    replied
    Well.

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