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There Is Now A Proposal For Shifting Fedora To An Annual Release Cadence

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  • There Is Now A Proposal For Shifting Fedora To An Annual Release Cadence

    Phoronix: There Is Now A Proposal For Shifting Fedora To An Annual Release Cadence

    Following the plan to cancel or significantly delay Fedora 31 to work on extensive tooling of the Linux distribution, there is a separate proposal that was volleyed suggesting Fedora move to an annual release cadence...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-2019-Proposal

  • #2
    Still organized like a beheaded chicken. What else is new?

    Comment


    • #3
      "We aim to make good progress on this project for Fedora 29 and plan to make Silverblue the preferred Workstation variant by Fedora 30." source: https://silverblue.fedoraproject.org/stories
      No wonder they want to update less often as people will be using flatpak.

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      • #4
        Don't these guys realize that the reason many of use want to see annual releases is to avoid the churn from breaking updates and the horrors of new distro installs twice a year. Frankly it is a problem with many distros so we shouldn't think Fedora is alone here. However more discipline in OS releases should make for stable API's for an entire year. That is a good thing considering that key components of Gnome are more mature than in the past.

        The idea of a rolling distro is enticing but we would need to see an entirely different approach ot gnome and apps. I'm not sure flatpaks are the answer.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tichun View Post
          "We aim to make good progress on this project for Fedora 29 and plan to make Silverblue the preferred Workstation variant by Fedora 30." source: https://silverblue.fedoraproject.org/stories
          No wonder they want to update less often as people will be using flatpak.
          Actually i see flatpaks as the best way to get to a rolling release.

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          • #6
            That is a good thing considering that key components of Gnome are more mature than in the past.
            Actually, they're working on gtk4 and that will introduce a whole new world of retro-compatibility and instability issues.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
              Don't these guys realize that the reason many of use want to see annual releases is to avoid the churn from breaking updates and the horrors of new distro installs twice a year. Frankly it is a problem with many distros so we shouldn't think Fedora is alone here. However more discipline in OS releases should make for stable API's for an entire year. That is a good thing considering that key components of Gnome are more mature than in the past.

              The idea of a rolling distro is enticing but we would need to see an entirely different approach ot gnome and apps. I'm not sure flatpaks are the answer.
              They just need to adopt the Arch>Manjaro method. By that I mean they need a Testing>Stable setup like Arch Linux has to have a 100% rolling solution and then have a semi-LTS that's ran similar to Manjaro and pulls in updates from the Rolling Stable as kinks are worked out and at predetermined times (like every Wednesday updates are thrown out unless it's a major security thing).

              The semi-LTS would be the desktop and workstation version. From there, they could take the semi-LTS and use it as a final testing version for server & LTS versions and push out regular, non-security updates, I dunno, let's say monthly. If done right it would allow a combination of rolling, security, and stability. I think more people want slow, gradual changes that are more vetted and they're tired of giant updates with major changes that risk breaking stuff.

              Personally, I don't like the concept of flatpaks/snaps/etc for open source software. Just seems stupid to run open source Linux software through a Linux compatibility layer on a Linux system. For closed source stuff I think they're great. But to use them as a way to get newer software on my desktop because X distribution is slow at updating...nope...I'll use Y distribution that updates faster. Most of the time we're wanting that newer stuff for performance and gaming reasons; running that kind of stuff through a layer defeats the purpose.

              That's my 2 cents on the matter.

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              • #8
                People still using Fedora? Archlinux is the way to go.

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                • #9
                  Typo:

                  Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                  "outdaed" software not just for six months but one year."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
                    Don't these guys realize that the reason many of use want to see annual releases is to avoid the churn from breaking updates and the horrors of new distro installs twice a year. Frankly it is a problem with many distros so we shouldn't think Fedora is alone here. However more discipline in OS releases should make for stable API's for an entire year. That is a good thing considering that key components of Gnome are more mature than in the past.

                    The idea of a rolling distro is enticing but we would need to see an entirely different approach ot gnome and apps. I'm not sure flatpaks are the answer.
                    Solus uses a rolling release scheme as well, but they test everything very well before pushing it through people's throats. Manjaro does the same (although to a lesser extent). Fedora could do the same they do.

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