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Fedora 29 Is Cleared For Release Next Tuesday

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  • Fedora 29 Is Cleared For Release Next Tuesday

    Phoronix: Fedora 29 Is Cleared For Release Next Tuesday

    After it was delayed last week, the beautiful Fedora 29 will greet the world next week...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...a-29-Next-Week

  • #2
    Any updates on XFCE4 compatibility?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dsmithhfx View Post
      Any updates on XFCE4 compatibility?
      XFCE is fully supported in Fedora. You can get the XFCE spin here: https://spins.fedoraproject.org/en/xfce/

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      • #4
        I've been using Fedora 29 beta for about 3 weeks as my primary OS, only had two big issues. XWayland apps crashed frequently and AMD GPU max power state regression. Both issues appear to be fixed

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        • #5
          Hi guys, I recently started using Fedora and it’s really great so far. But does anyone know if the dnf install speed could be improved? It seems to be unnecessarily checking for updates (and that part is somewhat slow) almost every time I run dnf install. Any tips / tricks? Thanks!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by veeableful View Post
            But does anyone know if the dnf install speed could be improved? It seems to be unnecessarily checking for updates (and that part is somewhat slow) almost every time I run dnf install.
            One of the key selling arguments for DNF used to be "inplace replacement", "maintainability" and "speed boost compared to yum". None of these arguments stood valid. It took years for DNF to pair up with YUM. There are still incompatibilities between YUM vs. DNF. Return values are still different if tasks behave differently. The command line arguments changed compared to YUM. Things like "dnf autoremove" seem to be broken recently (for a longer time now). The performance came to an crawl compared to YUM. Resolving of packages and dependencies used to be way much faster.

            The only good thing I can say about DNF is, it works. You can install packages with it. And probably no one else wants to touch it with a fork.

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            • #7
              Ok, then I am upgrading in december.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by veeableful View Post
                Hi guys, I recently started using Fedora and it’s really great so far. But does anyone know if the dnf install speed could be improved? It seems to be unnecessarily checking for updates (and that part is somewhat slow) almost every time I run dnf install. Any tips / tricks? Thanks!
                A range of plugins are available for dnf, including a "fastestmirror" and a "delta-rpm" which pulls down changes and rebuilds locally when that is likely to be faster than grabbing the entire updated rpm.

                If you're on Gnome, it defaults to checking for updates for you and prompting when they're ready. You can disable this. The Fedora spins use dnfdragora, a GUI installer/updater in the tradition of yumex. They also run "dnfdragora-updater" as a startup which periodically checks for updates and prompts the user. You can install dnfdragora in Gnome to get a more finegrained look at the repos than Software offers. (Not sure if the KDE spin uses dnfdragora-updater or Discover.)

                dnf can be invoked with a ranger of options, a number of which can be permanently entered into its config file: /etc/dnf/dnf.conf. "man dnf" will explain them.

                I disable background update checks and do my own, more or less daily, using "dnf --refresh update" which explicitly refreshes the cache.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by veeableful View Post
                  Hi guys, I recently started using Fedora and it’s really great so far. But does anyone know if the dnf install speed could be improved? It seems to be unnecessarily checking for updates (and that part is somewhat slow) almost every time I run dnf install. Any tips / tricks? Thanks!
                  Code:
                  dnf -C install package
                  Be aware that some packages are updated quite often so this command might ultimately fail since Fedora mirrors do not keep older versions of packages.
                  Last edited by birdie; 10-26-2018, 07:53 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by buzzrobot View Post

                    A range of plugins are available for dnf, including a "fastestmirror" and a "delta-rpm" which pulls down changes and rebuilds locally when that is likely to be faster than grabbing the entire updated rpm.

                    If you're on Gnome, it defaults to checking for updates for you and prompting when they're ready. You can disable this. The Fedora spins use dnfdragora, a GUI installer/updater in the tradition of yumex. They also run "dnfdragora-updater" as a startup which periodically checks for updates and prompts the user. You can install dnfdragora in Gnome to get a more finegrained look at the repos than Software offers. (Not sure if the KDE spin uses dnfdragora-updater or Discover.)

                    dnf can be invoked with a ranger of options, a number of which can be permanently entered into its config file: /etc/dnf/dnf.conf. "man dnf" will explain them.

                    I disable background update checks and do my own, more or less daily, using "dnf --refresh update" which explicitly refreshes the cache.
                    Thanks! I installed those plugins and will read up on the manual.

                    Originally posted by birdie View Post
                    Code:
                    dnf -C install package
                    Be aware that some packages are updated quite often so this command might ultimately fail since Fedora mirrors do not keep older versions of packages.
                    Ooh that's handy. Makes it similar to how Ubuntu's apt install works. Thanks!

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