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Ubuntu 18.10 Is A Nice Upgrade For Radeon Gamers, Especially For Steam VR

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  • Ubuntu 18.10 Is A Nice Upgrade For Radeon Gamers, Especially For Steam VR

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 18.10 Is A Nice Upgrade For Radeon Gamers, Especially For Steam VR

    Among the changes to find in Ubuntu 18.10 are the latest stable Linux kernel as well as a significant Mesa upgrade and also the latest X.Org Server. These component upgrades make for a better Linux gaming experience particularly if using a modern AMD Radeon graphics card. Here are some results as well as whether it's worthwhile switching to Linux 4.19 and Mesa 18.3-dev currently on Ubuntu 18.10.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26981

  • #2
    I can imagine people wanting to care about their system once 5 years or more. These 6 month releases would be awesome as point releases that update drivers (what if new hardware becomes popular but isn't supported? 6 months is still a long time). Well, that is if a distro wants to become reliable and suitable for mainstream usage.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tichun View Post
      I can imagine people wanting to care about their system once 5 years or more. These 6 month releases would be awesome as point releases that update drivers (what if new hardware becomes popular but isn't supported? 6 months is still a long time). Well, that is if a distro wants to become reliable and suitable for mainstream usage.
      What?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tichun View Post
        I can imagine people wanting to care about their system once 5 years or more. These 6 month releases would be awesome as point releases that update drivers (what if new hardware becomes popular but isn't supported? 6 months is still a long time). Well, that is if a distro wants to become reliable and suitable for mainstream usage.
        You should probably read the following page. In short, what you are proposing already exists.
        https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/LTSEnablementStack

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        • #5
          FireBurn, think of it like windows xp with service packs. windows xp was there 6 years before vista arrived. then 2 years for windows 7, 4 years for windows 8, 2 years for windows 10. these 2 year releases were failures so that's why so short period of time was in place. Heck, xp lost it's support a few years ago. Companies and home users don't like hassle. Meantime, Ubuntu LTS has to be updated to another version every ~3years, not 5, rest of the time is like xp support after new version was released. Look, 14.04, and previously 12.04, got extended paid support, because there was a need for it, as that is how companies work.

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          • #6
            Brisse, I know of that, but it is somewhat handicapped. No mesa, right? I can imagine it being right for nvidia users, but not for amd. And then, it has to be manually enabled and stuff. I would like to see a hassle-free operating system in the distrospace. No, arch is not the solution, but one can argue it is better than ubuntu, yet most people chose ubuntu, and it is so well supported that it valuable, go check some app, like upwork, or vk or idk, most software that releases for linux, it claims it supports ubuntu lts.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tichun View Post
              Brisse, I know of that, but it is somewhat handicapped. No mesa, right? I can imagine it being right for nvidia users, but not for amd. And then, it has to be manually enabled and stuff. I would like to see a hassle-free operating system in the distrospace. No, arch is not the solution, but one can argue it is better than ubuntu, yet most people chose ubuntu, and it is so well supported that it valuable, go check some app, like upwork, or vk or idk, most software that releases for linux, it claims it supports ubuntu lts.
              This should (could) be SteamOS (one day), no?

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              • #8
                The best thing is a rolling release distro like Arch, which always ships latest stable version. I don't even use git master mesa anymore.
                ## VGA ##
                AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
                Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tichun View Post
                  I can imagine people wanting to care about their system once 5 years or more. These 6 month releases would be awesome as point releases that update drivers (what if new hardware becomes popular but isn't supported? 6 months is still a long time). Well, that is if a distro wants to become reliable and suitable for mainstream usage.
                  The problem with your proposal is that most desktop linux components don't implement stable ABI's. Most open source projects have chosen to implement a rolling release version control system. The only possible way to keep a linux desktop up to date is to keep userspace packages at or near the latest release. You can't simply mix and match old userspace tools with new drivers or whatever, it won't work. I don't care at all what people think, I believe LTS disto's need to adopt a rolling release cycle. It's the only possible way to accomplish what you just asked for.

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                  • #10
                    @dubt229, are you saying that upgrading drivers (mesa and kernel, and maybe xorg) is not going to work with the rest of a system? Are you serious? People do so, but use PPA or compile things themselves, the problem is that most distros don't. If what you are saying is the case, then the OS is simply rubbish. Well.. one Linus' rant comes to mind..https://lkml.org/lkml/2018/8/3/621

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