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A Look At The Clear Linux Performance For July 2018

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  • #11
    kernel/glibc/gcc patches are the reason why Clear Linux is so fast. But Ubuntu is free to use them. I'm running Gentoo with most of the patches applied without any problems. Canoncial has a wide range of target systems so that would be the biggest problem.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by geearf View Post
      Nope
      ...
      And Nope.
      3rd try's the charm?
      Well for sure it's all of the tweaks/optimizations in the kernel to begin with. That's the heart of the OS. Followed by aggressive -O2 -march=native tweaks and more CFLAGS.

      Latest and greatest glibc, latest GCC, latest X Server, MQ-deadline by default, latest Mesa, performance scaling driver by default. So a kernel that's compiled with max optimization in mind, then all the packages compiled with those same optimizations in mind.

      The synergy of it all is what makes it glorious. I'm not sure what the secret sauce is but I have to be close right?

      Originally posted by [B
      dispat0r[/B];n1039108]
      kernel/glibc/gcc patches are the reason why Clear Linux is so fast. But Ubuntu is free to use them. I'm running Gentoo with most of the patches applied without any problems. Canoncial has a wide range of target systems so that would be the biggest problem.
      Could you share these patches? Would love to learn more. I know gcc 2.28 just came out. I'm running an incredibly smooth Ubuntu 18.10 cosmic so I will go with what they give me, but if you guys can share what you know it would be great. I am _definitely_ noticing a much snappier system after compiling my own kernel with everything I've talked about it. Learned a lot this past week.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by AsuMagic View Post

        Arch testing might be the most bleeding edge aside of Clear as of common distro.
        Fedora Rawhide begs to differ. Nothing beats Fedora Rawhide when it comes to bleeding edge.

        Why some people still think that a Linux distribution run by a handful of hobbyists is more advanced and bleeding edge than the distribution developed by the largest Linux company in the world which is also the driving force behind many important Linux FOSS projects, still remains unclear to me.

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