Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ubuntu Developers Working On Improvements To GNOME Software Store

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ubuntu Developers Working On Improvements To GNOME Software Store

    Phoronix: Ubuntu Developers Working On Improvements To GNOME Software Store

    Canonical/Ubuntu developers are working on improvements to the GNOME Software "app store" and recently held an in-person design sprint along with one upstream GNOME developer for coming up with improvements...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...GNOME-Software

  • #2
    Interesting, my philosophy of Ubuntu and its derivative distributions are pick your flavor. Then start stripping it down to the rails post install, rip out the network manager, blacklist unwanted modules. Don't use the video drivers from the packaging system, edit xorg.conf and vaporize your choice of symbolic links systemd is connected to and lastly keep your system up to date via apt only. Of coarse I have had good experience with synaptic too.
    Last edited by creative; 23 June 2018, 01:21 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you don't like it simply use something else. Personally I like 18.04 with Unite extension. They should show proprietary Nvidia to install choice and auto update to newest as I don't want to mess around with that anymore.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mike44 View Post
        If you don't like it simply use something else. Personally I like 18.04 with Unite extension. They should show proprietary Nvidia to install choice and auto update to newest as I don't want to mess around with that anymore.
        Did not say I did not like it, I just like to configure it my way more. I am thankful I can modify it to my liking. Is that not how most distributions are? Even most advanced windows users do the same to windows as much as they can, thats what makes a personal computer a personal computer. Linux allows virtually infinite modification of it.

        Ubuntu is great for making your own omelet recipe. You have to have those hens laying those eggs of course...
        Last edited by creative; 23 June 2018, 01:56 PM. Reason: Mountain top zebra.

        Comment


        • #5
          Too bad I don't like the "app store" thing at all, nor Gnome.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by creative View Post
            Interesting, my philosophy of Ubuntu and its derivative distributions are pick your flavor. Then start stripping it down to the rails post install, rip out the network manager, blacklist unwanted modules. Don't use the video drivers from the packaging system, edit xorg.conf and vaporize your choice of symbolic links systemd is connected to and lastly keep your system up to date via apt only. Of coarse I have had good experience with synaptic too.
            This is very similar to the approach you would have when dealing with Windows, but on Linux you can also go the other way, and actually install only the things you want, and configure them how you like them. That's more efficient, you learn more about what goes where, and imho it is a more "Linux" way of creating an OS made to your liking.

            I suggest to check out Arch Linux. Not to say you can't do what you want with Ubuntu too, just that Arch was designed for this kind of customization and user control over the system from the start, so they have (much) better documentation in their wiki, mostly manual installation process, and most packages are shipped with upstream default settings with little or no distro-specific modification.

            Gentoo distro is similar, but you also have control over the compile process of the packages.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
              Too bad I don't like the "app store" thing at all, nor Gnome.
              Then you can still hate Canonical then for not doing something you like.
              Be happy, hate Canonical!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                This is very similar to the approach you would have when dealing with Windows, but on Linux you can also go the other way, and actually install only the things you want, and configure them how you like them. That's more efficient, you learn more about what goes where, and imho it is a more "Linux" way of creating an OS made to your liking.

                I suggest to check out Arch Linux. Not to say you can't do what you want with Ubuntu too, just that Arch was designed for this kind of customization and user control over the system from the start, so they have (much) better documentation in their wiki, mostly manual installation process, and most packages are shipped with upstream default settings with little or no distro-specific modification.

                Gentoo distro is similar, but you also have control over the compile process of the packages.
                I have tried Arch. I need more time to use it. I had a bootable install. My hats off to you arch users out there and gentoo users. I tried Void as well and loved it.

                Yes similar to Windows approach, but not really. Some would argue that your not really learning Linux better using Arch or Gentoo, they say you are learning those particular distributions of GNU Linux better. There are different from scratch methods and everybody has their own particular way to build Arch or Gentoo all can differ in many instances vastly.

                I do however think that those distributions do give users a better birds eye view of what Linux is about.

                I started using Slackware and would do bare minimum installs back in 2002-2003 and by 2006 I was configuring and installing/running my own custom configured kernels centered around low latency audio. Before that in 2001 I started using Mandrake and Redhat.

                I continue to keep learning Linux and now own a book linux command line and shell scripting bible which is over 700 pages.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Been using Linux for close to 20 years and know about the build from scratch and can and have done minimal installs with success and configured and ran custom built kernels of my own with success. There are many ways of approaching all things GNU Linux.

                  Smashing ships inside bottles can be highly entertaining. Revenant.

                  I will always retain beginners mind though. Physical manuals are nice to own and read.
                  Last edited by creative; 23 June 2018, 07:18 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    This is very similar to the approach you would have when dealing with Windows, but on Linux you can also go the other way, and actually install only the things you want, and configure them how you like them. That's more efficient, you learn more about what goes where, and imho it is a more "Linux" way of creating an OS made to your liking.

                    I suggest to check out Arch Linux. Not to say you can't do what you want with Ubuntu too, just that Arch was designed for this kind of customization and user control over the system from the start, so they have (much) better documentation in their wiki, mostly manual installation process, and most packages are shipped with upstream default settings with little or no distro-specific modification.

                    Gentoo distro is similar, but you also have control over the compile process of the packages.
                    Ubuntu doesn't need much documentation to do some configuration like that, if you know to use the shell and a few apt commands.
                    e.g. you can simply remove network-manager with apt-get and this won't break your system (you should just know how to set up the simplest of set ups and know what eth0 is now called), at least if it's for a desktop with an RJ45 cable.
                    Installing a login manager or window manager will set it up (unless it doesn't, but you should be able to fall back on what you were using). The .deb packages have much autoconfiguration (but you may not be aware, or forget about the dpkg-reconfigure command that can set things up again)

                    This didn't work when doing apt-get remove plymouth. It's the splash screen, and I figured it was useless. The command prompted to remove every single package and I resisted any curiosity to acquiesce.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X