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Fedora 29 Might Hide The GRUB Boot Menu & It's Causing Lots Of Debate

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  • #11
    Sounds reasonable to me.. would shave a few seconds from boot. If you need to load from snapshot once in 5 years you can hit that ESC key.

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    • #12
      Here is a link with a post summarizing the discussion sofar:

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      • #13
        On dual boot machines, I'm supporter of EFI boot managers, built-in into each UEFI firmware. That way, Grub doesn't need to know about other OS-es, NTLDR doesn't need to know about non-Windows OS-es. What what they do not know, they cannot break, and there are no games of "my default changed behind my back".

        On Fedora, I'm already hiding the grub menu, with minimal timeout. Now if it was possible to persuade Grub not to switch to text mode & clear the screen, just to keep the UEFI framebuffer intact, it is not going to display anything away. Few moments later, the kernel will switch back, so the user is getting two ugly modeswitches with zero benefits.

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        • #14
          I actually agree with this decision. I do not care what the bootloader and the init process says, just want my computer to boot as fast as possible. Unless, of course, there is a problem, in which case I of course want to see that. And the currently suggested solution will allow for both. While if you always want to see it, all you will have to do is edit a few lines in the config file, which is I think manageable.

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          • #15
            I don't understand why "user friendly" distros like Fedora and Ubuntu even still use GRUB...

            I can see GRUB or Systemdboot on more "enthusiast" distros like arch and suse but if your intention is to make things easier, faster, and prettier for your end users why not something like rEFInd?

            Can have a timeout including "any" key bypass. Shows in graphics mode with configurable layout and icons. Can load EFI tools in addition to just the installed OSes. Has static configuration that doesn't need to be redone on updates, including on a per-OS basis for boot configuration. Can support whatever filesystems you want via EFI drivers. And best of all doesn't need to be aware ahead of time what OSes there are to boot because it just scans for EFI executables, including UEFI flash drives, external hard drives, etc.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by kevmif View Post
              We don't need to obfuscate every little thing from users.
              That is not the Gnome philosophy, at all...

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              • #17
                I haven't used any bootloader at all for years and that has served me well.

                EFISTUB+efibootmgr is the shit!

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                • #18
                  "For users wanting to still see the GRUB menu by default, they could still edit the /etc/default/grub. The plan is outlined on this Wiki page. ". Well, it's actually not that easy to change grub is it? You've left out an important step and when people need to make the change and can't because of incomplete documentation that causes unneeded stress.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by gbcox View Post
                    "For users wanting to still see the GRUB menu by default, they could still edit the /etc/default/grub. The plan is outlined on this Wiki page. ". Well, it's actually not that easy to change grub is it? You've left out an important step and when people need to make the change and can't because of incomplete documentation that causes unneeded stress.
                    It's pretty easy to change grub's configuration on Fedora, just edit /etc/default/grub and add any special OS in /etc/grub.d/ if you need to and run grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/efi/EFI/fedora/grub.cfg

                    People who don't know what grub or a kernel is are obviously not going to do this or figure out how to do it.

                    I'm on the fence on this one, I would like to keep the grub menu. And I can, it's just an additional thing I'll have to customize after installation. That's annoying but I do see the other side of the argument: If you don't know what a kernel is then you don't really need the option of choosing one when you boot. But even those people will benefit from being able to run a working kernel if they end up with one that doesn't - and Fedora isn't exactly a stable distribution.

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                    • #20
                      I think the default setting is not very important, but it is important to have the tool to change the setting. That's why I love openSUSE!

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