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Debian 10 "Buster" Should Be Out Around Mid-2019, Debian 12 Is "Bookworm"

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  • #31
    Originally posted by ThanosApostolou View Post
    Well, I still have those machines:

    1. Laptop with 32bit intel core duo cpu (one generation before 64bit core2 duo) which isn't that bad and it handles many tasks really well (I am actually trying to sell this one for about 50 euros).
    Check your laptop model. With $13 I upgraded my Core 2 Duo CPU to a better and faster version (supported by the motherboard), with 64-bit capability and even virtualization support. And I replaced the HDD with an SSD and I love how that laptop works - I don't even want to buy a new laptop yet, that's how well it performs. So if you have good upgrade options, give it a thought. The 256GB SSD (Samsung 850 Pro) wasn't cheap, but it's way cheaper than a new laptop. Of course, I installed the parts myself and I remove the dust periodically, so my 9-year-old laptop feels great with the new parts.

    Originally posted by ThanosApostolou View Post
    2. An old pc which I use without monitor for server tasks. Mostly for sharing my printer (which doesn't have network support on its own), remote torrents download and broadcasting media to my smart tv via minidlna, sharing files and a few other tasks. I have connected to it more than 5 IDE hard drives, so there are no cheap alternatives for this setup. Surely, in the future, with a small budget I could replace this with a big sata hard drive and a rhaspberry pi, but it still works fine so it's not quite worth it yet, in my opinion.
    It's definitely worth looking for a Raspberry Pi 3+, and here are some microSD Card Benchmarks done on different versions of Raspberry Pi. I use Samsung Evo+ 32GB on my Pis, and they are reasonably good. But you should definitely avoid doing intensive file-system tasks on the microSD card, because you would shorten its life with constant torrenting. The only bad thing is the Raspberry Pi PCs have USB 2.0, which doesn't support simultaneous read-write operations, so your torrenting would definitely be limited as a result, as long as your files are not completely downloaded. However, one external SATA drive connected over USB would successfully replace those old IDE drives, which are quite slow anyway. And although the Pi's major advantage in power draw compared to your "monstrous 5-disk setup" would not cover your acquisition costs in a short amount of time, it would certainly have a positive effect on the electrical monthly bill.

    Originally posted by ThanosApostolou View Post
    3. My mothers desktop pc which has intel pentium D cpu. It is still quite capable of browsing internet and libreoffice tasks and I think it's still doing a better job than a rhaspberry pi.
    Years ago, I donated my old Pentium D PC to my mother, and it is arguably better than a Raspberry Pi, although the CPU only has one core. Of course a new CPU and a SSD would bring it to life, but I'm not eager to spend any money on a PC that old. And replacing it with a Raspberry Pi would require an HDMI-VGA converter to connect it to the existing monitor, so again I'm not exactly eager with this perspective. The good thing is she rarely uses it, so I'm off the hook.

    Originally posted by ThanosApostolou View Post
    4. Finally, a not so old netbook (I believe one of the last 32bit netbooks) in which my father currently has windows 7 and I'm trying to convince him to install some linux on it (Debian is the last remaining 32bit distro with good quality in my opinion).
    I have one of these as well - a Dell Mini 10, with an dual-core Atom 32-bit CPU @1.6GHz and 1GB RAM, and with a little bit of research and tuning I got it to play 720p YouTube with Debian - not in the browser, but with mpv. Anyway, it's a very nice little netbook and even if it could run 64-bit software on it, the lack of an RAM upgrade option from 1GB of RAM is unappealing. 64-bit software needs more RAM, so even with zram activated I'd still use 32-bit software on it. And Debian 32-bit is a very good option.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by PackRat View Post
      Third party developers do not target rolling development distro's and this is why Nvidia and Amd don't make drivers for Arch.
      Third party developers should target users, of course if they want users

      Of course distros who have everything rolling non stop in unpredictable directions can't be easely targeted, sometimes even by its user
      Last edited by dungeon; 04-17-2018, 11:42 PM.

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      • #33
        Does this forum have a habit of "eating" replies? Because I wrote one and it still didn't show up. I don't see it queued up for approval or anything... it's like I didn't write it. What could be going on?

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        • #34
          Originally posted by kneekoo View Post
          Does this forum have a habit of "eating" replies?
          Yeah, that seems happens randomly like steam survey - someone get it often, someone only rare, sometimes and someone never

          Antibot Police you know, picking someone randomly
          Last edited by dungeon; 04-18-2018, 02:47 AM.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by ThanosApostolou View Post
            Probably Debian 10 will be the final operating system I will install on my old 32bit machines. I currently use Ubuntu 16.04 but I wont' upgrade them to 18.04 since there's not enough testing in ubuntu 32bit archives since the official flavor has dropped support. Also, many 3rd party software is not available for Ubuntu latest versions 32bit (e.g. megasync), but I hope they will support Debian 32bit for a little bit more.
            In Debian, 64bit only surprases 32bit back in 2012. So, 5 years after first 64bit release in 2007.

            Currently there are still likely too much and more than 10% users of 32bit x86 Debian. So, still sounds not ideal to be dropped... maybe when it is bellow 5% somewhere around 2021. or maybe even year 2023.

            Probably Debian will do demoting like this for 11 and for 12 only compatibility libraries or something like that helpers... so 10 is probably the last clear one, altough does not sound it would be LTS also, so 2022. looks like hot spot there, what is exactly 10 years after became used by majority

            AFAIR, Microsoft dropped Windows XP nearly at about 20% of estimated userbase (that was huge) and only after 3 to 4 years after life got bellow 5% silencio... now, not mention that with Windows 7 problem looks like even bigger than with XP
            Last edited by dungeon; 04-18-2018, 05:10 AM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by kneekoo View Post
              Does this forum have a habit of "eating" replies? Because I wrote one and it still didn't show up. I don't see it queued up for approval or anything... it's like I didn't write it. What could be going on?
              If you linked to another site your post could be under review before your post is posted.

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              • #37
                I've had good luck running Debian weekly builds, which I install after checking the bug reports.

                If you run the daily snapshots you ought to expect problems from time to time, that's why you are using them; to report bugs.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
                  You have not used Debian testing/sid for 4 years. What only breaks in Sid is qt applications, qt libraries come first and then the application after a week or two delay. Debian testing does not have that problem. You can use non qt applications meanwhile. Arch Linuxes are not Steam games compatible (see system requirements) , so anything than Debian testing/sid Xfce is at the bottom of my list. Oibaf ppa gives you latest Mesa git fastest too.
                  Actually, I'm using Debian testing for both my home server and work office PC. Although Debian has dramatically improved the past 2 or so years, I still get updates with conflicting packages or something that no longer works the way I expect it to. The most recent example of this is samba, where Debian's update just totally broke my cifs mounts, even though I didn't tell it to change the config files. This happened within the past month.
                  I use Arch for my gaming PC and it works just fine. In fact, I'd argue Arch is easier to get Steam set up than Debian, thanks to the AUR. Arch is also easier when it comes to Mesa git, though, I don't typically want that either.
                  Last edited by schmidtbag; 03-10-2019, 12:58 PM.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
                    Steam is easy to install to Debian: https://wiki.debian.org/Steam
                    I know it is. I never said it wasn't.

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