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Early Features Begin Receiving Approval For Fedora 29

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  • Early Features Begin Receiving Approval For Fedora 29

    Phoronix: Early Features Begin Receiving Approval For Fedora 29

    Today was another weekly Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo). We had been looking forward to this meeting for a decision on the GNOME auto-suspend by default behavior but there wasn't a quorum and that topic was then diverted until next week. But there were also early Fedora 29 features approved this week...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Features-Begin

  • #2
    Shouldn't auto suspend be a no brainer. Seriously if you are running on line power would it not make sense to keep auto suspend off?

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    • #3
      I tried Fedora 28 for a month, but i ended up giving up on it because Pulse audio just didn't work most of the time.
      So i don't give much for their approval process, since an essential bart of the desktop was clearly broken.

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      • #4
        Congratulations, you are the one in the millions.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pracedru View Post
          I tried Fedora 28 for a month, but i ended up giving up on it because Pulse audio just didn't work most of the time.
          So i don't give much for their approval process, since an essential bart of the desktop was clearly broken.
          Have you tried Pipewire?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pracedru View Post
            I tried Fedora 28 for a month, but i ended up giving up on it because Pulse audio just didn't work most of the time.
            Removing Pulse Audio has been standard procedure of installing a new Linux distribution for me on various systems for years now. At least three times I "re-tried" if it does not suck anymore, and was reminded that indeed, it still sucks. Just use the underlying ALSA and be done.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dwagner View Post
              Removing Pulse Audio has been standard procedure of installing a new Linux distribution for me on various systems for years now. At least three times I "re-tried" if it does not suck anymore, and was reminded that indeed, it still sucks. Just use the underlying ALSA and be done.
              Haven't had pulseaudio problems for years. I've had good success with openSUSE, Arch and Ubuntu. As you say though, just use ALSA if you have a problem. Easy enough.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by pracedru View Post
                I tried Fedora 28 for a month, but i ended up giving up on it because Pulse audio just didn't work most of the time.
                So i don't give much for their approval process, since an essential bart of the desktop was clearly broken.
                Would you file bug report to Pulseaudio team and provide the hardware specification? Chance is possible a driver issue.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pracedru View Post
                  I tried Fedora 28 for a month, but i ended up giving up on it because Pulse audio just didn't work most of the time.
                  So i don't give much for their approval process, since an essential bart of the desktop was clearly broken.
                  It's alpha/beta software. Expect bugs.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pracedru View Post
                    I tried Fedora 28 for a month, but i ended up giving up on it because Pulse audio just didn't work most of the time.
                    So i don't give much for their approval process, since an essential bart of the desktop was clearly broken.
                    The Change approval process has no bearing on such issues. It's about major and (potentially) disruptive changes to packaging or replacement of some widely used piece of software by another one (yum→dnf, pulseaudio→pipewire, etc). Routine upgrades of software to new versions (like pulseaudio, kernel, dbus or anything else which could be the source of your problems) are done by maintainers without any bureaucracy.

                    If pulseaudio is misbehaving in F28 beta, you should file a bug https://bugzilla.redhat.com/enter_bu...dio&version=28 with a description of the issue, attach journalctl output, versions of rpms (kernel, dbus, gnome-shell or other DE you are using, pulseaudio) and the maintainers will take it from there.

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